Information Services for People with Developmental Disabilities: The Library Manager's Handbook

Front Cover
Linda Lucas Walling, Marilyn Money Irwin
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1995 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 344 pages


Developmental disabilities are the most numerous of disabilities, and they are exceptionally complex. This professional reference overviews developmental disabilities, discusses the information needs of people with developmental disabilities, and provides practical guidance to librarians and information professionals who serve them. Particular attention is given to the ramifications of the Americans with Disabilities Act for librarians.

The first part of the book defines and describes developmental disabilities from perspectives relevant to librarians and information professionals. The second part examines key life issues that have a major impact on people with developmental disabilities. This section emphasizes the current trend toward the inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in mainstream society. References to related information sources are included throughout. The third part looks at disabilities from the perspective of the library or other information agency. An appendix lists organizations, agencies, businesses, and libraries that provide additional materials.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Developmental Disabilities Lifelong Severe and Alterable
iii
The Issues
15
Young Children Intervention and Education
21
Education
29
Technology
37
Living in the Community
53
The Role of Leisure Time
61
6 Transportation
73
Recreational Reading for Adults with Mental Retardation
175
Outreach Special Needs Centers and Mainstreaming Services Options for Public Library Service
189
Managing Successful Public Library Services for Information Access
199
Academic Libraries and Students with Developmental Disabilities
211
Equipping SelfAdvocates with Effective Information Access Skills
223
The Information Needs of Employers Planning to Comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act
233
Institution Libraries Serving a Changing Clientele
245
Information Centers A Series of Cameos
255

Employment
89
Aging People with Developmental Disabilities
97
Library and Information Services
107
Toys Games and Other Tangibles Library Provision and Use
117
Sharing Literature with Children Who Have Developmental Disabilities
133
The School Media Centers Role in Meeting the Needs of Youth with Disabilities
147
Helping Adults with Mental Retardation Satisfy Their Information Needs
159
Standards and Guidelines for Information Service
267
Conclusion
273
Sources of Information Equipment and Materials
279
Select Bibliography
285
Index
287
About the Editors and Contributors
319
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page v - ... reflects the person's need for a combination and sequence of special, interdisciplinary, or generic care, treatment, or other services which are of lifelong or extended duration and are individually planned and coordinated.
Page v - ... results in substantial functional limitations in three or more of the following areas of major life activity...
Page 93 - reasonable accommodation" may include (A) making existing facilities used by employees readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities; and (B) job restructuring, part-time or modified work schedules, reassignment to a vacant position, acquisition or modification of equipment or devices, appropriate adjustment or modifications of examinations, training materials or policies, the provision of qualified readers or interpreters, and other similar accommodations for individuals with...
Page xxii - Deaf* means a hearing impairment which is so severe that the child is impaired in processing linguistic information through hearing, with or without amplification, which adversely affects educational performance. (2) "Deaf-blind' means concomitant hearing and visual impairments, the combination of which causes such severe communication and other developmental and educational problems that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for deaf or blind children. (3) "Hard of hearing"...
Page 93 - Act; (B) the overall financial resources of the facility or facilities involved in the action; the number of persons employed at such facility; the effect on expenses and resources, or the impact otherwise of such...
Page iv - ... a disability attributable to mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, or another neurological condition found by the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare to be closely related to mental retardation or to require treatment similar to that required for mentally retarded individuals...
Page 93 - reasonable accommodation" may include making existing facilities used by employees readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities; and job restructuring, part-time or modified work schedules, reassignment to a vacant position, acquisition or modification of equipment or devices, appropriate adjustment or...
Page 93 - The type of operation or operations of the covered entity, including the composition, structure and functions of the workforce...
Page 93 - In addition, an employer is not required to make an accommodation if it would impose an "undue hardship" on the operation of the employer's business. "Undue hardship" is defined as an "action requiring significant difficulty or expense" when considered in light of a number of factors.
Page 93 - Factors to be considered. In determining whether an accommodation would impose an undue hardship on a covered entity, factors to be considered include: (i) The...

About the author (1995)

LINDA LUCAS WALLING is Professor in the College of Library and Information Science at the University of South Carolina. She has authored and edited several books and articles on library services for people with disabilities.

MARILYN M. IRWIN is Director of the Center for Disability Information and Referral at the Institute for the Study of Developmental Disabilities, and a part-time Assistant Professor in the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University.

Bibliographic information