Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed]
[graphic]

No. IV.-IN USE AT THE NATIONAL SOCIETY'S CENTRAL BOYS' SCHOOL.

[ocr errors]

91

104
to

11
11$

to 12-2

3 24

31

Drawing on Reading History of England
Catechism and

Ciphering,
Writing Reading, and Exposition M. W. & F.; and Hogarth's Geography,

Geography &

Ciphering,
Liturgy, with

Revisal
upon Paper of the Holy Bible Mental Arith.

Elements of

alternately, with New Rules Script. Proofs

Tues, & Th. Etymology and Grammar

Astronomy
Catechism and

Writing from
Writing Ciphering, Reading with Explanation

New
Liturgy, with

Linear
Script. Proofs upon Paper
old Rules

Arithmetical Ciphering, Diet., & Geng.
and Grammar
Testament Drawing

Tables
New Rules

alternately
Mental Calcu-
Catechism

Reading Miscellaneous Book, Dictation and
Arithmetic, Reading New Linear

Writing
lations and
with Explanation and

Ciphering

Geography on
with Proofs Old Rules Testament Drawing

upon Paper

New Rules
Arith. Tables

Grammar

alternate days
Arithmetic, Geography, &

Writing from
Catechism Reading New Linear

Ciphering, Writing Reading, Explanation,

Dict.; Terms
with Proofs Testament Drawing

Revisal of Arithmetic Ta- New Rules upon Paper Spelling and Grammar
Old Rules bles alternately

in Geog. &c.
Catechism,

Reading Miscellaneous
from

Tables & Spell-
Reading New Ciphering

Linear
Analysis and | Dictation or

Ciphering, Writing apon
ing on alter-

Book, Explanation,
Testament Old Rules

Drawing New Rules Paper
Scrip. Proofs
Memory
nate Days

Spelling and Grammar

Arithmetic
Catechism
Reading

Definitions in
Ciphering,

Writing upon Reading New

Linear

Reading and
and

New
Writing upon Slates, Tables

Geography &
Revisal
with Analysis

Testament
Paper

Drawing
Spelling

Spelling
Definitions &c.

Rules

Grammar
Reading Arithmetic

Definitions in
Catechism Reading and

Writing
Arithmetical Religious

Linear

and
Arithmetic, &c.

from

Geography &
with Analysis Spelling in Desks

Tables Instruction
Spelling

Drawing
Black Board

Grammar

Arithmetic Definitions in Writing in Reading and
Catechism Linear Arithmetic, Reading and Spelling from

Arithmetic

from Geography & Desks from Religious
with Analysis Drawing Numeration Miscellaneous Book

Tables
Black Board Grammar Black Board Instruction
Writing in

Arithmetic

T.&Th. Draw. Reading
Arithmetic,

Spelling in
Religious

Arithmetic
Catechism
Reading

M. W. & Fr.
Desks from
from

and
Numeration

Classes
Instruction

Tables
Black Board

Black Board

Writ. on Slates Spelling
Writing in
Addition and Arithmetic

Reading

Writing
Spelling and

Religious

Arithmetic
Catechism Reading Desks from

from
Multiplication

and
Reading
Instruction

Tables
Black Board
Tables Black Board

Spelling

Slates
Addition and

Writing in

Addit, & Sub. Writing on Addition and

Religious
Spelling and

Arithmetic
Catechism Reading Multiplication

Desks from

traction from

Slates in Multip:ication Reading

Instruction
Tables

Tables
Black Board
Black Board Seats

Tables
Theory and Practice of Vocal Music on Tuesday and Friday Mornings.

Poetry.

LITTLE CHILDREN.

11

Sporting through the forest wide ;
Playing by the water side ;
Wandering o'er the heathy fells;
Down within the woodland dells;
All among the mountains wild,
Dwelleth many a little child !
In the baron's hall of pride;
By the poor man's dull fireside ;
Mid the mighty, 'mid the mean,
Little children may be seen ;
Like the flowers that spring up fair,
Bright, and countless, everywhere!
In the far Isles of the main!
In the desert's lone domain ;
In the savage mountain-glen,
'Mong th? tribes of swarthy men;
Wheresoe'er a foot hath gone;
Wheresoe'er the sun hath shone
On a league of peopled ground,
Little children may be found !
Blessings on them! they in me
Move a kind of sympathy,
With their wishes, hopes, and fears ;
With their laughter and their tears;
With their wonder, so intense,
And their small experience!
Little children, not alone
On the wide earth are ye known;
Mid its labours, and its cares,
'Mid its sufferings, and its snares.
Free from sorrow, free from strife,
In the world of love and life,
Where no sinful thing hath trod;
In the presence of your God,
Spotless, blameless, glorified,
Little children, ye abide!

(From The Child at Home.")

The Editor's Portfolio.

A HUMAN EDUCATION BETTER THAN A PROFESSIONAL ONE.

That then is the best education which best calls forth, cultivates, corrects, and perfects the various faculties of man. And this is a truth which it is highly important to keep in view ; because, unless we bear it in mind, much of the course of our education must seem most strange and unnatural : and in fact a different idea very extensively prevails, and is supported by very plausible arguments, which, viewing education not so much with reference to man in gene

ral, as to the particular parts which each individual may be called to fill, lays stress rather on the acquisition of knowledge to be turned to account in particular walks of life, than on that improvement of the capacities and faculties which may best enable men to acquire and use all knowledge, whatsoever their sphere of action may be.

As regards the acquisition of knowledge, the purpose of education is rather to excite than to satisfy the appetite for it. And though all knowledge is to be honoured for its own sake, and may be turned to much useful account, its acquisition, though a part, is a very subordinate part of school education ; and this rather as a means to other objects than as an end itself. And therefore the subjects of boyish study have, by the approved wisdom of master minds in forner ages, been selecied rather with a view to the improvement of the moral and intellectual powers, than to storing the mind with knowledge with a view to immediate proficiency in the arts of life. It is not by endeavouring that boys may be taught the elements of law, because they may hereafter be lawyers ; or be prematurely versed in controversial theology, in order to fit them for divines ; or by making them conversant with the business of trade and merchandise, as a qualification for those walks of life ; or by giving them a smattering of the physical sciences, as a means of rearing up young philosophers. It is not, I say, in this way that men will be formed of high and commanding intellect-men such as have been-men fitted to have the guidance of their fellows, and in each sphere of action, whatever it may be, to bring the powers of well-developed, trained, and matured minds to bear upon their duties, and so to advance the glory of God in promoting the welfare of their fellow men.Sermon at the opening of the school at Marlborough, for the sons of clergymen and others, by the Bishop of Salisbury.

THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE THE FIRST ELEMENT IN A LIBERAL EDUCATION.

Is establishing, therefore, a new institution, it is not our object to adopt a new system of education, but to follow that which experience and reflection alike approve. The course of education of our great public schools—the course preparatory to that of the Universities—will be pursued in this place. The study of the language will be made its chief aliment; because this study is found to be eminently fitted for the improvement of young minds—strengthening the memory without fatiguing it, and giving a due and varied employment to the reasoning powers.

And in this department we shall give the first and chief place to the classic and immortal languages of Greece and Rome, which have long formed the groundwork of liberal education in this country. It is indeed often questioned, even by men who admit the purpose of education to be discipline, not acquirement, and who recognise the fitness of the study of language as a means to this, whether it be right that so much attention should be given to the acquisition of what are called dead languages, rather than to those which are in living use at the present day. But a man, who is no mean authority on this subject, has said, “I am not one of those who think that in the system of English education too much time and labour are employed in the study of the languages of Greece and Rome. It is a popular, but, in my humble opinion, a very shallow and vulgar objection. It would be easy, I think, to prove that too much time can be scarcely employed on these languages by any nation which is desirous of preserving either that purity of taste which is its brightest ornament, or that purity of morals which is its strongest bulwark."* In fact, we must go to the source and fountain head if we would have what is

• Sir J. Mackintosh, Life, vol. i. p. 117.

« PreviousContinue »