Pelham, Or Adventures of a Gentleman

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Rand, McNally & Company, 1901 - English fiction - 513 pages

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Page 441 - CHAPTEE LXXVI. But wilt thou accept not The worship the heart lifts above, And the Heavens reject not? The desire of the moth for the star, Of the night for the morrow, The devotion to something afar From the sphere of our sorrow ?— PB
Page 388 - Cos. Brutus, I do observe you now of late ; I have not from your eyes that gentleness And show of love as I was wont to have.—Julius Casar. I ROSE at my usual early hour; sleep had tended to calm, and I
Page 274 - vais vivre et manger en sage.' * CHAPTER LIX. I do defy him, and I spit at him, Call him a slanderous coward and a villain— Which to maintain I will allow him odds.—Shakspeare. I FOUND Glanville walking before the door with a rapid
Page 279 - LX. Charge, Chester, charge I—Marmion. Though this was one of the first mercantile transactions of my life, I had no doubt about acquitting myself with reputation.—• Vicar of Wakefield. THE next morning I was at breakfast, when a packet was brought me from Tyrrell; it contained a sealed letter to
Page 450 - leave England for CHAPTER LXXVI. But wilt thou accept not The worship the heart lifts above, And the Heavens reject not? The desire of the moth for the star, Of the night for the morrow, The devotion to something afar From the sphere of our sorrow ?— PB Shelley. IT. was not with a light heart—for I loved Glanville too well not to be powerfully affected by his awful
Page 216 - as they are with folly, youth, and wine. —Johnson's "London." Hoi. Novi hominem tanquam te—his humour is lofty, his discourse peremptory, his tongue filed, his eye ambitious, his gait majestical, and his general behaviour vain, ridiculous, and thrasonical.
Page 23 - of his broad eyes rolled in his head, And glared betwixt a yellow and a red ; He looked a lion with a gloomy stare, And o'er his eyebrows hung his matted hair. ' Well remembered, and better applied—eh, Mr. Pelham?" "Really," said I,
Page 234 - Whilst we do speak, our fire Doth into ice expire ; Flames turn to frost, And ere we can Know how our crow turns swan, Or how a silver snow Springs there, where jet did grow, Our fading spring is in dull winter lost.—Jasper Mayne.
Page 397 - There was a pause for some moments, at the end of which Glanville thus began. CHAPTER LXXIV. I do but hide, Under these words, like embers, every spark Of that which has consumed me. Quick and dark The grave is yawning ;—as its roof shall cover My limbs with dust and worms, under and over, So let oblivion hide this grief.—Julian and
Page 336 - CHAPTER LXVII. In solo vivendi causa palato est.—Juvenal. They would talk of nothing but high life, and high-lived company ; with other fashionable topics, such as pictures, taste, Shakspeare, and the musical

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