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THE LITTLE SPEAKER.

You'd scarce expect a boy like me
To get up here where all can see,
And make a speech as well as those
Who wear the largest kind of clothes.
I think it was in olden time,

That some one said in funny rhyme,
"Tall aches from little toe-corns grów,
Large screams from little children flow."
And if that rhymer told the truth,
Though I am now a little youth,
Perhaps I'll make as great a noise,
As some who are much larger boys.
I will not speak of Greece and Rome,
But tell you what I've learned at home,
And what was taught me when at school,
While sitting on a bench or stool;
I've learned to talk, and read, and spell,
And don't you think that's pretty well
For such a little boy as I?

But I must leave you-so good bye.

ANNUAL REVOLUTION OF THE EARTH.*

The earth, at the distance of ninety-five millions of miles from the sun, revolves around it once a year, describing an annual circuit of about five hundred and ninety-seven millions of miles. Hence, this world, with all its burden of oceans, seas and continents, must move forward about sixty-eight thousand miles an hour.

At every swing of the pendulum we are carried nearly nineteen miles through space. Yet the earth neither jolts, nor rocks, nor jars; for the air, the clouds, the ocean, the hills and the mountains move with us, and we are not sensible of the motion.

Held in its orbit by the attractive power of the sun, and bathed in the light of its controlling luminary, the earth sweeps onward and onward in its swift career, until it comes back to the point whence it started.

And such is the beauty and perfection of its motion, that if it were possible to fix golden rings in the path of this moving body, of such diameter as to permit the earth to pass through with a single hair's breadth to spare, this planet would roll onward in its course, from century to century, and from age to age, passing uniformly and invariably through these golden rings, with no shadow of variation from its first motion.

Wine is a mocker; strong drink is raging; and whoso is deceived thereby is not wise. Be not among wine-bibbers, among riotous eaters of flesh; for the glutton and the drunkard shall come to poverty, and drowsiness shall clothe a man with rags.

The picture on the opposite page represents three boys learning to speak. That and the article which follows, and this article, are taken from "The Student's Speaker," which contains many pretty pieces in prose and poetry, and many good dialogues, suitable for young pupils. These articles are inserted here for reading lessons, and also to furnish boys with something to speak.

NEW, AND HIGHLY APPROVED SCHOOL BOOKS,

PUBLISHED BY

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BROCKLESBY'S METEOROLOGY: which treats of the Winds, Hurricanes, Water Spouts, Rain, Clouds, Dew, Snow, Electricity, (atmospheric,) Rainbows, Meteorites, Aurora Borealis, &c. The Elements of Meteorology is already introduced into a considerable number of High Schools. It has the cordial recommendation of Prof. E. Loomis, Prof. D. Olmsted, Prof. B. Silliman, Rev. T. H. Gallaudet, J. L. Comstock, M. D., and numerous teachers of the first respectability in their profession. DODD'S ARITHMETIC: in which have been attempted various improvements in arrangement and nomenclature, as well as in the means of securing thorough discipline in the principles and application of the science. By Prof. J. B. DODD, of Kentucky. Of this work, R. T. P. Allen. Esq., Supt. Ky. Mil. Institute, says:"I believe it admirably adapted to the purpose of instruction,-in fact, by far the most convenient and useable book for teacher and pupil that I have seen." Stiles French, Esq., Teacher of Mathematical School, New Haven, says: "I am confident that teachers will, on trial, find it to be a book of uncommon excellence." Similar testimony, to a larger extent, can be furnished, but teachers will deem this sufficient to call their attention to the book.

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Bullions' Series of Grammars, viz.,

PRACTICAL LESSONS IN GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION.
ANALYTICAL AND PRACTICAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR.
THE PRINCIPLES OF LATIN GRAMMAR.

FIRST LESSONS IN GREEK.

THE PRINCIPLES OF GREEK GRAMMAR.

JALATIN READER, WITH NOTES AND VOCABULARY.
A GREEK REader, with NOTES AND VOCABULARY.
THE FIRST SIX BOOKS OF CÆSAR'S COMMENTARIES.

LATIN LESSONS, BY GEORGE SPENCER, A. M.

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OLNEY'S QUARTO GEOGRAPHY, The Maps in this work contain but little besides what the pupil is required to learn, consequently it facilitates the progress of the pupil, and saves labor on the part of the teacher. This Geography was prepared at the suggestion of many of the teachers, and is already extensively introduced from preference. Few books have proved so uniformly acceptable for common schools. OLNEY'S SCHOOL GEOGRAPHY AND ATLAS. This world-renowned book is not behind any of its competitors, in point of execution and accuracy. The Atlas is probably superior to any other, and contains a Map of the World as known to the Ancients, besides numerous important Tables. The whole work is as complete and correct as a new book, and will continue to maintain its character, though alterations will be avoided as far as possible.

OLNEY'S OUTLINE MAPS, AND OLNEY'S PRIMARY GEOGRAPHY, are intended for young pupils, by the same author.

BENTLEY'S PICTORIAL SPELLING BOOK. A beautifully illustrated and highly attractive book for children.

GALLAUDET'S ILLUSTRATIVE DEFINER. The best book for teaching the right use of words, and the art of composition.

KIRKHAM'S EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION.

THE STUDENT'S PRIMER, by J. S. DENMAN. Being on a plan somewhat new, this Primer has obtained great popularity.

THE STUDENT'S SPEAKER, for young pupils.

THE STUDENT'S SPELLING-BOOK, on the Analytical plan, by the author of the "Student's Primer."

THE WORKS OF VIRGIL, WITH COPIOUS NOTES, &c. also, a Table of Reference. By Rev. J. G. COOPER, A. M.

Comstock's Series of Books of the Sciences, viz.,

INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL PHILOSOPHY, for children.

SYSTEM OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY, revised and enlarged.

NEW ELEMENTS OF CHEMISTRY.

THE YOUNG BOTANIST, for beginners, with cuts.

ELEMENTS OF BOTANY AND VEGETABLE PHYSIOLOGY, with cuts. OUTLINES OF PHYSIOLOGY, both comparative and human.

(NEW) ELEMENTS OF GEOLOGY.

ELEMENTS OF MINERALOGY.

NATURAL HISTORY OF BEASTS AND BIRDS, showing their comparative size, and containing anecdotes, illustrating their babits and instincts. The immense sale of Dr. Comstock's books, renders it probable that they are familiar to most teachers. They are so admirably adapted to the school-room, that the "Philosophy" has been republished in several European countries. Revised editions of several of these works have been recently issued, including late discoveries and improvements.

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P., W. & Co. have always for sale an assortment of School and Miscellaneous Books, Blank Books, Paper, Pens, and Stationery, suited to the wants of Country Dealers.

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