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" Tragedy endeavours, as far as possible, to confine itself to a single revolution of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit; whereas the Epic action has no limits of time. "
The classical movement in French literature - Page 48
by Hugh Fraser Stewart - 1923 - 164 pages
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Aristotle's Theory of Poetry and Fine Art: With a Critical Text and a ...

Samuel Henry Butcher - Aesthetics - 1895 - 384 pages
...poetry admits but one kind of metre, and iť% narrative in form. They differ, again, in length : for Tragedy endeavours, as far as possible, to confine...revolution of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit ; whereas the Epic action has no limits of time. This, then, is a second point of difference; though...
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Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association

American Philological Association - Classical philology - 1906
...of metre, and is narrative in form. They differ, again, in their length : for Tragedy endeavors, so far as possible, to confine itself to a single revolution of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit ; whereas the Epic action has no limits in time. This, then, is a second point of difference ; though...
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The Poetics of Aristotle

Aristotle - Aesthetics - 1898 - 111 pages
.../ieXos : perpov Vettori : Kai /ieXos seclus. Tyrwhitt. 31. fiJtwov : fuSpia S length of the action : for Tragedy endeavours, as far as possible, to confine...revolution of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit ; whereas the Epic action has no limits of time. This, then, is a second point of difference ; though...
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The Drama: Its Law and Its Technique

Elisabeth Woodbridge Morris - Drama - 1898 - 181 pages
...verse of characters of a higher type. . . . They differ, again, in length : for Tragedy endeavors, as far as possible, to confine itself to a single...of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit; whereas the Epic action has no limits of time." 2 The first two passages quoted, emphasizing the need...
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The Drama; Its Law and Its Technique

Elisabeth Woodbridge Morris - Drama - 1898 - 181 pages
...verse of characters of a higher type. . . . They differ, again, in length : for Tragedy endeavors, as far as possible, to confine itself to a single...of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit; whereas the Epic action has no limits of time." 2 The first two passages quoted, emphasizing the need...
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Aristotle's Theory of Poetry and Fine Art

Aesthetics - 1898 - 409 pages
...'-T'-;/" .•** .л * i *• t* ^ * ARISTOTLE'S POETICS V. 4— VI. 4 23 length of the action : for Tragedy endeavours, as far as possible, to confine itself to a single revolution of the sgn. or but slightly to exceed this limit ; whereas the Epic_action has no limits of time. This, then,...
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A History of Literary Criticism in the Renaissance: With Special Reference ...

Joel Elias Spingarn - Criticism - 1899 - 330 pages
...says that the action of tragedy and that of epic poetry differ in length, "for tragedy endeavors, so far as possible, to confine itself to a single revolution of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit ; whereas the epic action has no limits of time." 1 This passage is the incidental statement of an...
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The Universal Cyclopaedia, Volume 12

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1900
...lie was led, therefore, to make the empirical statement (Poet/en, ch. iv.), that " tragedy endeavors, as far as possible, to confine itself to a single...revolution of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit ; whereas the epic action has no limits of time ; . . . though at first the same freedom was admitted...
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A Short History of French Literature

Leon Emile Kastner, Henry Gibson Atkins - French literature - 1907 - 312 pages
...Of the Unity of Time all Aristotle says is, when comparing Epic poetry with Tragedy, that the latter "endeavours as far as possible to confine itself to...of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit; whereas the Epic action has no limits of time ". Thus Aristotle, far from laying down a hard-and-fast...
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Shakespeare and His Critics

Charles Frederick Johnson - 1909 - 386 pages
...metre and is narrative in form. They differ again in the length of the action, for Tragedy endeavors as far as possible to confine itself to a single revolution...of the sun or but slightly to exceed this limit.' On this sentence is founded the rule of ' Unity of time.' Corneille, writing in 1656, Discours de Vutilite...
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