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" It is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatick fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment, was ever credited. "
The classical movement in French literature - Page 52
by Hugh Fraser Stewart - 1923 - 164 pages
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

Samuel Johnson - English literature - 1806
...received, by discovering that they have given more trouble to the poet, than pleasure to the auditor. The necessity of observing the unities of time and...the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Rome, supposes,that when the playopenc, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1806
...principle, a position, which, while his breath is forming it .into words, his understanding pronounces io be false. It is false, that any representation is...next at Rome, supposes, that when the play opens the spec-, tator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre has been...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, L. L. D.: In Twelve Volumes, Volume 2

Samuel Johnson - 1809
...pronounces to be false. It is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality ; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for...passing the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Home, supposes, that when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare. Whittingham's ed, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1814
...pronounces to be false. It is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality ; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for...passing the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Home, supposes, that when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1814
...m Its materiality was ever credible^ or, for a angle moment, was ever credited. «,ih ollJ«'ti0,u arising from the impossibility of passing the first...at Alexandria, and the next at Rome, supposes, that wienthe play opens, the spectator really imagines liimsclf at Alexandria, and believes that his walk...
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Pantologia. A new (cabinet) cyclopædia, by J.M. Good, O. Gregory ..., Volume 4

John Mason Good - 1819
...to be false. It is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatic fal>>, in its materiality, was ever credible, or, for a single moment, was ever credited. *l The objection arising frum the inipossibilily of passing the first hour at Alexandria, and tinnext...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - Theatre - 1821
...commonly without resistance or reply. It is time therefore to tell him, by the authority of Shakspeare, that he assumes, as an unquestionable principle, a...the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Rome, supselves ; nor are imposed on any poet, either by the nature, or the fnil, of the dramatick imitation...
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The British review and London critical journal, Volume 19

1822
...sagacious critic truly denies " that any representation is mistaken for reality ; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment was ever credited." To this reasoning we perfectly assent, and where a tragedy is not written for representation, as from...
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Philological tracts, &c

Samuel Johnson - Authors, English - 1823
...itself; that what was a house cannot become a plain; that what was Thebes can never be Persepolis. It is time, therefore, to tell him by the authority...passing the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Home, supposes, that when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and...
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A New Translation of Aristotle's Rhetoric: With an Introduction and Appendix ...

Aristotle - Rhetoric - 1823 - 493 pages
...perspicuity and intrepidity, " It is false that any representation is mistaken for reality, that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or for a single moment was ever credited."29 But Johnson, when he wrote these words, had a cause to defend, and when this was the case,...
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