Memoirs of the life of Peter Daniel Huet, bishop of Avranches, written by himself, tr. by J. Aikin, Issue 444, Volume 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 13 - ... excited the envy of my companions, they did every thing in their power to interrupt me in my studies : my books were stolen, my papers torn, or wetted or greased so as not to bear ink, and my chamber door was barred, that whilst they were at play I might not be lurking in my room with a book, as 1 was frequently detected in doing.
Page 340 - Gardez-vous d'imiter ce rimeur furieux, Qui de ses vains ecrits lecteur harmonieux, Aborde en recitant quiconque le salue, Et poursuit de ses vers les passans dans la rue : II n'est Temple si saint, des Anges respecte, Qui soit contre sa Muse un lieu de surete.
Page 319 - Malherbe d'un heros peut vanter les exploits ; Racan chanter Phillis, les bergers et les bois.
Page 13 - They did everything," says he, " in their power to interrupt me in my studies; my books were stolen; my paper torn or spoiled; my chamber-door was barred, that whilst they were at play I might not be lurking in my room with a book, as I was frequently detected in doing." But this was not all. He adds, " In order to indulge my taste, it was my custom to rise with the sun, whilst they were buried in sleep, and either hide myself in the wood, or seek some thick shade, which might conceal me from their...
Page 237 - I resolved to set apart an entire week for the attentive recollection of all the errors of my past life, and the more careful regulation of my future days pursuant to the injunctions of the Divine law. And oh ! that I had in earnest adhered to my engagements ! but I too readily suffered myself to be borne away by the fire of youth, the allurements of the world, and the pleasures of study, which by their variety so filled my breast and closed up all its inlets with an infinity of thought, that it...
Page 109 - Historique de 1'Eglise de Rome,' the pope caused him to be expelled from the order of Jesuits. Louis XIV. on this occasion gave him a pension, and he retired to the abbey of St. Victor at Paris, where he died in 1686. The four propositions which Maimbourg, with the greater part of the French clergy, maintained are : — 1. That the pope has no authority in temporal matters. 2. That the general councils of the church are superior to the pope. 3. That the pope may err in. his decisions, which are subject...
Page 2 - ... punge the stains of my former life, 'yet a more urgent cause has given me the final impulse, a severe and nearly fatal disease, with which I struggled for six whole months, and from which I am not entirely recovered. By this sharp, but salutary admonition, I felt myself summoned by God to scrutinize the ingrained spots of my conscience, and most humbly and submissively lay them before his sight. I therefore thought I should perform a grateful task in presenting an account of my past years to...
Page 238 - ... my breast, and closed up all its inlets with an infinity of thought, that it gave no admission to those intimate and charming conferences with the Supreme Being. Under this feebleness of soul with respect to Divine things I have laboured during the whole course of my life; and even now the frequent wanderings of a volatile mind blunt my aspirations to God, and intercept all the benefit of my prayers. When from time to time God has invited me to godly exercises for the purpose of confirming in...
Page 340 - Gardez vous d'imiter ce rimeur furieux, Qui de ses vains ecrits lecteur harmonieux Aborde en recitant quiconque le salue, Et poursuit de ses vers les passans dans le rue, Nay, fly to altars ; there they'll talk you dead ; For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.
Page 34 - I have reason to be highly grateful to God for his singular favour, in framing me so, that not only during the vigorous period of youth, but down to my present state of senile debility, no protraction of study by day or night, no want of exercise in a sedentary life, has ever given me a sense of fatigue or languor; but I have always, after six or seven hours without intermission spent over my books, arisen from them fresh and cheerful, sometimes even in high spirits, singing to myself and the Muses,...

Bibliographic information