The Quarterly Review, Volume 248

Front Cover
William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle)
John Murray, 1927 - English literature
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Page 262 - I scarcely had one night of quiet sleep Such ghastly visions had I of despair And tyranny, and implements of death, And long orations which in dreams I pleaded Before unjust Tribunals, with a voice Labouring, a brain confounded, and a sense...
Page 196 - It begins by a recital, that all the parts of this realm of England and Wales be presently with rogues, vagabonds, and sturdy beggars exceedingly pestered, by means whereof daily happeneth in the same realm horrible murders, thefts, and other great outrage, to the high displeasure of Almighty God, and to the great annoyance of the common weale.
Page 80 - Thou deep Base of the World, and thou high Throne Above the World, whoe'er thou art, unknown And hard of surmise, Chain of Things that be, Or Reason of our Reason ; God, to thee I lift my praise, seeing the silent road That bringeth justice ere the end be trod To all that breathes and dies.
Page 345 - I take possession of man's mind and deed. I care not what the sects may brawl. I sit as God holding no form of creed, But contemplating all.
Page 200 - The bane of all pauper legislation has been the legislating for extreme cases. Every exception, every violation of the general rule to meet a real case of unusual hardship, lets in a whole class of fraudulent cases, by which that rule must in time be destroyed. Where cases of real hardship occur, the remedy must be applied by individual charity, a virtue for which no system of compulsory relief can be or ought to be a substitute.
Page 349 - LORD, who shall dwell in thy tabernacle? or who shall rest upon thy holy hill ? 2 Even he that leadeth an uncorrupt life, and doeth the thing which is right, and speaketh the truth from his heart : 3 He that hath used no deceit in his tongue, nor done evil to his neighbour, and hath not slandered his neighbour...
Page 261 - A Residence in France, during the Years 1792, 1793, 1794, and 1795 ; described in a Series of Letters from an English Lady: with general and incidental Remarks on the French Character and Manners.
Page 162 - The extraterritoriality stipulation may have relieved the native official of some troublesome duties, but it has always been felt to be offensive and humiliating, and has ever a disintegrating effect, leading the people, on the one hand, to despise their own Government and officials, and, on the other, to envy and dislike the foreigner withdrawn from native control.
Page 378 - He made an administration, so checkered and speckled; he put together a piece of joinery, so crossly indented and whimsically dove-tailed; a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified Mosaic; such a tesselated pavement without cement; here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white; patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans; whigs and tories; treacherous friends and open enemies : that it was indeed a very curious show; but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to stand...
Page 249 - God, to the end that ye may obey the bishop and the presbytery without distraction of mind ; breaking one bread, which is the medicine of immortality and the antidote that we should not die but live for ever in Jesus Christ.

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