Remarks on and Translation of Milton's Treatise: Of Education

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Budack, 1858 - 18 pages
 

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Page 15 - But here the main skill and groundwork will be to temper them such lectures and explanations upon every opportunity as may lead and draw them in willing obedience, inflamed with the study of learning and the admiration of virtue; stirred up with high hopes of living to be brave men and worthy patriots, dear to God and famous to all ages.
Page 2 - I call therefore a complete and generous Education that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully and magnanimously all the offices both private and public of peace and war.
Page 1 - It is to be regretted that the prose writings of Milton should, in our time, be so little read. As compositions, they deserve the attention of every man who wishes to become acquainted with the full power of the English language. They abound with passages compared with which the finest declamations of Burke sink into insignificance. They are a perfect field of cloth of gold. The style is stiff with gorgeous embroidery. Not...
Page 14 - First, to find out a spacious house and ground about it fit for an academy, and big enough to lodge a hundred and fifty persons, whereof twenty or thereabout may be attendants, all under the government of one, who shall be thought of desert sufficient, and ability either to do all, or wisely to direct and oversee it done.
Page 1 - As compositions, they deserve the attention of every man who wishes to become acquainted with the full power of the English language. They abound with passages compared with which the finest declamations of Burke sink into insignificance. They are a perfect field of cloth of gold. The style is stiff with gorgeous embroidery. Not even in the earlier books of the Paradise Lost...
Page 1 - Lost has the great poet ever risen higher than in those parts of his controversial works in which his feelings, excited by conflict, find a vent in bursts of devotional and lyric rapture. It is, to borrow his own majestic language, "a seven-fold chorus of hallelujahs and harping symphonies.
Page 15 - ... forcing the empty wits of children to compose themes, verses, and orations, which are the acts of ripest judgment and the final work of a head filled by long reading and observing with elegant maxims and copious invention.
Page 3 - Puritans, had been sternly repressed, and, if gratified at all, had been gratified by stealth, broke forth with ungovernable violence as soon as the check was withdrawn. Men flew to frivolous amusements and to criminal pleasures with the greediness which long and enforced abstinence naturally produces. Little restraint was imposed by public opinion. For the nation, nauseated with cant, suspicious of all pretensions to sanctity, and still smarting from the recent tyranny of rulers austere in life...
Page 17 - ... and religion in a more unsatisfactory state in this very country than in almost any other in the north of Europe: we see nowhere a people in a more abject political and civil condition, or with less free agency in their social economy. A national education, which gives a nation neither religion, nor morality, nor civil liberty, nor political liberty, is an education not worth having.
Page 27 - Kl. einer Anstalt zu bestimmenden Lehrbücher oder Leitfäden ist eben so in der Geographie wie in der Geschichte auf zwei zu beschränken, und den nebeneinander danach unterrichtenden Lehrern ist zur Pflicht zu machen, sich wegen eines möglichst übereinstimmenden Verfahrens in Benutzung derselben zu verständigen. Bei der Wahl sowohl derjenigen Bücher, welche dem Unterricht zu Grunde gelegt, als die für die Schülerbibliotheken angeschafft...

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