Transactions of the Royal Society of Literature of the United Kingdom

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H. Milford, Oxford University Press, 1914 - English literature
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Page 155 - O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown ! The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword : The expectancy and rose of the fair state, The glass of fashion and the mould of form, The observed of all observers, quite, quite down!
Page 169 - The observ'd of all observers, quite, quite down ! And I, of ladies most deject and wretched, That suck'd the honey of his music vows, Now see that noble and most sovereign reason, Like sweet bells jangled out of tune and harsh; That unmatch'd form and feature of blown
Page 136 - Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed Your leaves, nor ever bid the Spring adieu: And, happy melodist, unwearied, For ever piping songs for ever new; More happy love! more happy, happy love! For ever warm and still to be enjoyed, For ever panting, and for ever young; All breathing human passion far above, That leaves a heart high-sorrowful and cloyed, A burning forehead, and a parching tongue.
Page 142 - Hung be the heavens with black, yield day to night ! Comets, importing change of times and states, Brandish your crystal tresses in the sky, And with them scourge the bad revolting stars That have consented unto Henry's death ! King Henry the Fifth, too famous to live long ! England ne'er lost a king of so much worth.
Page 187 - By all the eagle in thee, all the dove; By all thy lives and deaths of love; By thy large draughts of intellectual day And by thy thirsts of love, more large than they; By all thy...
Page 182 - Whinny-muir thou com'st at last : And Christe receive thy saule. If ever thou gavest hosen and shoon, — Every nighte and alle, Sit thee down and put them on ; And Christe receive thy saule.
Page 260 - So, when this loose behaviour I throw off, And pay the debt I never promised, By how much better than my word I am, By so much shall I falsify men's hopes ; And, like bright metal on a sullen ground, My reformation, glittering o'er my fault, Shall show more goodly and attract more eyes Than that which hath no foil to set it off.
Page 202 - I have felt A presence that disturbs me with the joy Of elevated thoughts ; a sense sublime Of something far more deeply interfused, Whose dwelling is the light of setting suns, And the round ocean and the living air, And the blue sky, and in the mind of man : A motion and a spirit, that impels All thinking things, all objects of all thoughts, And rolls through all things.
Page 53 - ... or for him that farms; But when amid such pleasing scenes I trace The poor laborious natives of the place, And see the mid-day sun, with fervid ray, On their bare heads and dewy temples play; While some, with feebler heads and fainter hearts, Deplore their fortune, yet sustain their parts: Then shall I dare these real ills to hide In tinsel trappings of poetic pride?
Page 130 - ... supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you; and being an absolute Johannes Factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.

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