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ENCOURAGEMENTS TO A LOVER

Why so pale and wan, fond lover?

Prythee, why so pale?
Will, when looking well can't move her,

Looking ill prevail?
Prythee, why so pale?

5

Why so dull and mute, young sinner?

Prythee, why so mute?
Will, when speaking well can't win her,

Saying nothing do 't?
Prythee, why so mute?

10

Quit, quit, for shame! this will not move,

This cannot take her;
If of herself she will not love,

Nothing can make her:
The D-1 take her!

15 1638.

Sir John Suckling.

CONSTANCY

Out upon it, I have loved

Three whole days together!
And am like to love three more,

If it prove fair weather.

4

To Dianeme

Time shall moult away his wings

Ere he shall discover
In the whole wide world again

Such a constant lover.

8

But the spite on 't is, no praise

Is due at all to me:
Love with me had made no stays,

Had it any been but she.

12

Had it any been but she,

And that very face,
There had been at least ere this
A dozen dozen in her place.

Sir John Suckling.

16

1638.

TO DIANEME

SWEET, be not proud of those two eyes
Which starlike sparkle in their skies;
Nor be you proud that you can see
All hearts your captives, yours yet free;
Be you not proud of that rich hair
Which wantons with the love-sick air;
Whenas that ruby which you wear,
Sunk from the tip of your soft ear,
Will last to be a precious stone

When all your world of beauty 's gone. 1648.

Robert Herrick.

IO

UPON JULIA'S CLOTHES

WHENAs in silks my Julia goes,
Then, then, methinks, how sweetly flows
The liquefaction of her clothes !

Next, when I cast mine eyes and see
That brave vibration each way free,
LO how that glittering taketh me!

Robert Herrick.

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THE PRIMROSE

Ask me why I send you here
This sweet Infanta of the year?
Ask me why I send to you
This primrose, thus bepeárld with dew?
I will whisper to your ears :-
The sweets of love are mix'd with tears. 6

Ask me why this flower does show
So yellow-green, and sickly too?
Ask me why the stalk is weak
And bending (yet it doth not break)?
I will answer:- These discover

What fainting hopes are in a lover. 1648.

Robert Herrick.

I2

TO THE VIRGINS, TO MAKE MUCH

OF TIME

GATHER ye rosebuds while ye may,

Old Time is still a flying;
And this same flower that smiles to-day

To-morrow will be dying.

4

The glorious lamp of Heaven, the sun,

The higher he's a getting,
The sooner will his race be run,

And nearer he's to setting.

8

The age is best which is the first,

When youth and blood are warmer;
But being spent, the worse and worst

Times still succeed the former.

12

Then be not coy, but use your time,

And, while ye may, go marry;
For having lost but once your prime,
You may forever tarry.

16 1648.

Robert Herrick.

DELIGHT IN DISORDER

A SWEET disorder in the dress
Kindles in clothes a wantonness;
A lawn about the shoulders thrown
Into a fine distraction;

An erring lace, which here and there
Inthralls the crimson stomacher;
A cuff neglectful, and thereby
Ribbons to flow confusedly ;
A winning wave, deserving note,
In the tempestuous petticoat;
A careless shoestring, in whose tie
I see a wild civility ;-
Do more bewitch, me than when art

Is too precise in every part. 1648.

Robert Herrick.

IO

TO ANTHEA; WHO MAY COMMAND

HIM ANYTHING

Bid me to live, and I will live

Thy Protestant to be;
Or bid me love, and I will give

A loving heart to thee.

4

A heart as soft, a heart as kind,

A heart as sound and free
As in the whole world thou canst find,

That heart I'll give to thee.

8

Bid that heart stay, and it will stay

To honour thy decree:
Or bid it languish quite away,
And 't shall do so for thee.

12

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