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And now to thee she comes ; still, still the same
As in the hours gone unregarded by!
To thee, how changed, comes as she ever came ;
Health on her cheek, and pleasure in her eye!

Nor less, less oft, as on that day, appears,
When lingering, as prophetic of the truth,
By the wayside she shed her parting tears-
For ever lovely in the light of Youth !

TO A FRIEND ON HIS MARRIAGE.

1798.

On thee, blest youth, a father's hand confers
The maid thy earliest, fondest wishes knew.
Each soft enchantment of the soul is hers;
Thine be the joys to firm attachment due.

As on she moves with hesitating grace,
She wins assurance from his soothing voice;
And, with a look the pencil could not trace,
Smiles thro' her blushes, and confirms the choice.
Spare the fine tremors of her feeling frame!
To thee she turns—forgive a virgin's fears !
To thee she turns with surest, tenderest claim ;
Weakness that charms, reluctance that endears!

At each response the sacred rite requires,
From her full bosom bursts the unbidden sigh.
A strange mysterious awe the scene inspires ;
And on her lips the trembling accents die.

O'er her fair face what wild emotions play!
What lights and shades in sweet confusion blend!
Soon shall they fly, glad harbingers of day,
And settled sunshine on her soul descend !

Ah soon, thine own confest, ecstatic thought!
That hand shall strew thy summer path with flowers ;
And those blue eyes, with mildest lustre fraught,
Gild the calm current of domestic hours !

TO

THE YOUNGEST DAUGHTER OF LADY *

Ah! why with telltale tongue reveal
What most her blushes would conceal ?*
Why lift that modest veil to trace
The seraph-sweetness of her face?
Some fairer, better sport prefer;
And feel for us, if not for her.

For this presumption, soon or late,
Know thine shall be a kindred fate.
Another shall in vengeance rise-
Sing Harriet's cheeks, and Harriet's eyes ;
And, echoing back her wood-notes wild,
-Trace all the mother in the child !

*

Alluding to some verses which she had written on an elder sister. THE ALPS AT DAYBREAK.

1782.

THE sunbeams streak the azure skies,

And line with light the mountain's brow: With hounds and horns the hunters rise,

And chase the roebuck thro' the snow.

From rock to rock, with giant-bound,
High on their iron poles they pass;
Mute, lest the air, convulsed by sound,
Rend from above a frozen mass.

The goats wind slow their wonted way, Up craggy steeps and ridges rude ; Marked by the wild wolf for his prey, From desert cave or hanging wood.

And while the torrent thunders loud,

And as the echoing cliffs reply,
The huts peep o'er the morning-cloud,
Perched, like an eagle's nest, on high.

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