The Fables of Aesop: Based on the Texts of L'Estrange and Croxall

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Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1903 - Animals - 230 pages
 

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Pretty good
Some spelling and grammatical mistakes but otherwise a good download.

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Dissapointed
All of your free booksg are wayyyyy to short. Esops fabels were my favorite childhood stories, yet I find this book, as many pages it original has, seem to be compilrd into a mini mag read.

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Contents

I
3
II
6
IV
7
V
10
VI
12
VII
13
VIII
14
IX
17
XLVII
126
XLVIII
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XLIX
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LI
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LII
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LIII
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LIV
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LV
145

X
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XXVIII
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XXX
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XXXVII
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XL
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LVI
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LXI
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LXII
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LXXX
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LXXXVII
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XC
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XCII
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XCIII
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Copyright

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Page 151 - THE CROW AND THE PITCHER. A CROW, ready to die with thirst, flew with joy to a Pitcher, which he beheld at some distance.
Page 56 - A dog was lying upon a manger full of hay. An ox, being hungry, came near, and offered to eat of the hay ; but the envious, illnatured cur, getting up and snarling at him, would not suffer him to touch it. Upon which, the ox in the bitterness of his heart...
Page 222 - Ass, not liking the noise, nor the strange handling that he was subject to, broke the cords that bound him, and, tumbling off the pole, fell into the river. Upon this, the old man, vexed and ashamed, made the best of his way home again, convinced that by endeavouring to please everybody he had pleased nobody, and lost his Ass into the bargain The Cat and the Mice.
Page 173 - Gentlemen, I wonder how you dare abuse one that, you know, could in an instant scorch you up, and burn every mother's son of you; but the only answer I shall give you, or the revenge I shall take of you, is, to
Page 204 - ... went to the mountains in search of game. All the beasts of the forest fled at his approach. The Lion alone challenged him to combat. The Bowman immediately let fly an arrow, and said to the Lion: " I send thee my messenger, that from him thou mayest learn what I myself shall be when I assail thee.
Page 16 - THE WIND AND THE SUN A DISPUTE once arose between the North Wind and the Sun as to which was the stronger of the two.
Page 190 - It is no more than justice, quoth the Farmer, to be sure : But, what did I say ? — I mistake. It is your bull that has killed one of my oxen. Indeed ! says the Lawyer ; that alters the case : I must inquire into the affair ; and if — And IF ! said the Farmer — the business, I find, would have been concluded without an IF, had you been as ready to do justice to others as to exact it from them.
Page 86 - THE FOX AND THE STORK. A Fox one day invited a Stork to dinner, and being disposed to divert himself at the expense of his guest, provided nothing for the entertainment but some thin soup in a shallow dish. This the Fox lapped up very readily, while the Stork, unable to gain a mouthful with her long narrow bill, was as hungry at the end of dinner as when...
Page 117 - I was so concerned, that I could not rest till I came to see you. Pray, how is it with you now ? let me feel your pulse a little ; indeed you do not look well at all.
Page 210 - The master," he replied. Then said the Wolf : " May no friend of mine ever be in such a plight; for the weight of this chain is enough to spoil the appetite." The Rivers and the Sea. THE Rivers joined together to complain to the Sea, saying : " Why is it that when we flow into your tides so potable and sweet, you work in us such a change, and make us salt and unfit to drink?" The Sea, perceiving that they intended to throw the blame on him, said : " Pray cease to flow into me, and then you will not...

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