The Englishman's Magazine, Volume 2, Issues 13-14

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James Burns, 17 Portman Street, Portman Square, 1842

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Page 57 - Because they promise them both by their sureties; which promise, when they come to age, themselves are bound to perform.
Page 5 - Thou preparedst room before it, and didst cause it to take deep root, and it filled the land. The hills were covered with the shadow of it, and the boughs thereof were like the goodly cedars. She sent out her boughs unto the sea, and her branches unto the river.
Page 185 - O Friend ! I know not which way I must look For comfort, being, as I am, opprest, To think that now our life is 'only drest For show ; mean handy-work of craftsman, cook, Or groom! — We must run glittering like a brook In the open sunshine, or we are unblest: The wealthiest man among us is the best: No grandeur now in nature or in book Delights us. Rapine, avarice, expense, This is idolatry : and these we adore : Plain living and high thinking are no more: The homely beauty of the good old cause...
Page 270 - God before her moved, An awful guide, in smoke and flame. By day, along the astonished lands The cloudy pillar glided slow ; By night, Arabia's crimsoned sands Returned the fiery column's glow.
Page 92 - A GOOD sword and a trusty hand ! A merry heart and true ! King James's men shall understand What Cornish lads can do. And have they fixed the where and when? And shall Trelawny die? Here's twenty thousand Cornish men Will know the reason why...
Page 97 - I would rather [said he] have the rod to be the general terror to all, to make them learn, than tell a child, if you do thus, or thus, you will be more esteemed than your brothers or sisters. The rod produces an effect which terminates in itself. A child is afraid of being whipped, and gets his task, and there's an end on't; whereas, by exciting emulation and comparisons of superiority, you lay the foundation of lasting mischief; you make brothers and sisters hate each other.
Page 100 - Almighty GOD, the giver of all good things, without whose help all labour is ineffectual, and without whose grace all wisdom is folly : grant, I beseech Thee, that in this undertaking thy Holy Spirit may not be with-held from me, but that I may promote thy glory, and the salvation of myself and others: grant this, O Lord, for the sake of thy son, JESUS CHRIST. Amen...
Page 106 - Why, Sir; to be sure when you wish a man to have that belief which you think is of infinite advantage, you wish well to him ; but your primary consideration is your own quiet. If a madman were to come into this room with a stick in his hand, no doubt we should pity the state of his mind; but our primary consideration would be to take care of ourselves. We should knock him down first, and pity him afterwards.
Page 107 - For some time before his death, all his fears were calmed and absorbed by the prevalence of his faith, and his trust in the merits and propitiation of Jesus Christ. "He talked often to me about the necessity of faith in the sacrifice of Jesus, as necessary beyond all good works •whatever for the salvation of mankind.
Page 150 - But if he will not hear thee, then take with thee one or two more, that in the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may be established.

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