Terrae-filius, Or, The Secret History of the University of Oxford, 1721-1726

Front Cover
University of Delaware Press, 2004 - Literary Collections - 500 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
Edited with an Introduction and Notes by William E. Rivers In his Terrae-Filius essays of 1721, Nicholas Amhurst describes and satirizes Oxford life as he saw it during the 1710s and early 1720s. Although academic and intellectual issues receive abundant attention, Amhurst devoted even more space to the political, religious, social, and moral issues that often worked to undercut the university's academic goals. Written in an energetic, personal prose style characteristic of the best eighteenth-century essay periodicals, the Terrae-Filius essays provide accessible, entertaining reading for anyone interested in the history of Oxford University, early eighteenth-century British culture, or the close but often tense relationship between the nation and the university during the tumultuous decade following the Whig ascendancy of 1714. This modern critical edition of the Terrae-Filius reprints all the essays (including those omitted in the 1726 collected editions) and provides an introduction and extensive explanatory notes that set the essays in their historical and cultural context. William E. Rivers is Professor of English at the University of South Carolina.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

VIII
79
IX
368
XI
403
XII
405
XIII
416
XIV
420
XV
442
XVI
445
XVII
448
XVIII
452
XIX
471
XX
484
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 62 - there is more joy in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, than over ninety and nine just persons that need no repentance.
Page 69 - Exegi monumentum aere perennius Regalique situ pyramidum altius, Quod non imber edax, non Aquilo impotens Possit diruere aut innumerabilis Annorum series et fuga temporum.
Page 24 - I am in hopes that we may order our affairs so as to meet this summer at the Bath; for Mr Pope and myself have thoughts of taking a trip thither. You shall preach, and we will write lampoons ; for it is esteemed as 'great an honour to leave the Bath for fear of a broken head, as for a Terrae Filius of Oxford to be expelled.

References to this book

Bibliographic information