The Poems of the Pleasures: Consisting of The Pleasures of Imagination, by Mark Akenside; The Pleasures of Memory, by Samuel Rogers; The Pleasures of Hope, by Thomas Campbell; The Pleasures of Friendship, by James M'Henry

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1841 - Friendship - 346 pages

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Page 122 - The powers of man : we feel within ourselves His energy divine : he tells the heart, He meant, he made us to behold and love What he beholds and loves, the general orb Of life and being ; to be great like him, , Beneficent and active.
Page 121 - Each passing hour sheds tribute from her wings ; And still new beauties meet his lonely walk, And loves unfelt attract him. Not a breeze Flies o'er the meadow, not a cloud imbibes The setting Sun's effulgence, not a strain From all the tenants of the warbling shade Ascends, but whence his bosom can partake Fresh pleasure, unreproved.
Page 44 - Of envied life; though only few possess Patrician treasures or imperial state; Yet Nature's care, to all her children just, With richer treasures and an ampler state, Endows at large whatever happy man Will deign to use them.
Page 29 - It is this sense which furnishes the imagination with its ideas ; so that by ' the pleasures of the imagination,' or ' fancy' (which I shall use promiscuously), I here mean such as arise from visible objects, either when we have them actually in our view, or when we call up their ideas into our minds by paintings, statues, descriptions, or any the like occasion.
Page 50 - Decrees its province in the common toil. To some she taught the fabric of the sphere, The changeful Moon, the circuit of the stars, The golden zones of Heaven ; to some she gave To weigh the moment of eternal things, Of time, and space, and Fate's unbroken chain, And will's quick impulse : others by the hand She led o'er vales and mountains, to explore What healing virtue swells the tender veins Of herbs and flowers ; or what the beams of morn Draw forth, distilling from the clifted rind In balmy...
Page 122 - Fresh pleasure only : for the attentive mind, By this harmonious action on her powers, Becomes herself harmonious : wont so oft In outward things to meditate the charm Of sacred order, soon she seeks at home To find a kindred order, to exert Within herself this elegance of love, This fair inspired delight : her tempered powers Refine at length, and every passion wears A chaster, milder, more attractive mien.
Page 236 - Yes ! thy proud lords, unpitied land ! shall see That man hath yet a soul — and dare be free ! A little while, along thy saddening plains, The starless night of Desolation reigns ; Truth shall restore the light by Nature given, And like Prometheus, bring the fire of Heaven ! Prone to the dust Oppression shall be hurled, Her name, her nature, withered from the world...
Page 96 - Of curst ambition ; when the pious band• Of youths who fought for freedom and their sires, Lie side by side in gore ; when ruffian pride Usurps the throne of justice, turns the pomp...
Page 149 - Her tattered mantle, and her hood of straw ; Her moving lips, her caldron brimming o'er ; The drowsy brood that on her back she bore, Imps, in the barn with mousing owlet bred, From rifled roost at nightly revel fed ; Whose dark eyes flashed through locks of blackest shade, When in the breeze the distant watch-dog bayed : — And heroes fled the Sibyl's muttered call, Whose elfin prowess scaled the orchard wall.
Page 235 - Oh ! bloodiest picture in the book of Time Sarmatia fell unwept, without a crime ; Found not a generous friend, a pitying foe, Strength in her arms, nor mercy in her woe...

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