Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" I shall here define it to be a conceit arising from the use of two words that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense. The only way therefore to try a piece of wit, is to translate it into a different language. If it bears the test, you may pronounce... "
Penny Cyclopaedia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge - Page 124
1841
Full view - About this book

Select British Classics, Volume 37

English literature - 1803
...promote vigour of body and ease of mind. ' The Pun is defined by one who seems to be no wellwisher to it, to be " a conceit arising from the use of two words...that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense." Now if this be the essence of the Pun, how great must we allow the dignity of it to be, when • we...
Full view - About this book

Selections from the Spectator, Tatler, Guardian, and Freeholder: Selections ...

English essays - 1804
...punning.. Having pursued the history of a pun from its origiwal to its downfall, I shall here define it to be a conceit arising from the use of two words that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense. The only way therefore to Iry a piece of wit, is to translate it into a different language. If it bears...
Full view - About this book

The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Volume 3

Joseph Addison - 1811
...punning. Having pursued the history of a pun, from its original to its downfal, I shall here define it to be a conceit arising from the use of two words that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense. The only way, therefore, to try a piece of wit, is to translate it into a different language : if it...
Full view - About this book

The Spectator

Joseph Addison, Richard Hurd - 1811
...punning. Having pursued the history of a pun, from its original to its downfal, I shall here define it to be a conceit arising from the use of two words that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense. The only way, therefore, to try a piece of wit, is to translate it into a different language : if it...
Full view - About this book

The Spy, a periodical paper of literary amusement and instruction ..., Issue 1

1810
...a word of the same sound which has been used by another person ; or, as Addison defines it, " it is a conceit arising from the use of two words that agree in sound, but differ in sense." • This has justly been termed the lowest species of wit, (if wit it...
Full view - About this book

The Spectator [by J. Addison and others]: with sketches of the lives of the ...

Spectator The - 1816
...punning. Having pursued the history of a pun, from its original to its downfal, I shall here define it to be a conceit arising from the use of two words that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense. The only way therefore to try a piece of wit, is to translate it into a different language. If it bears...
Full view - About this book

The British essayists; to which are prefixed prefaces by J. Ferguson, Volume 36

British essayists - 1819
...punning. Having pursued the history of a pun, from its original to its downfal, I shall here define it to be a conceit arising from the use of two words that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense. The only way therefore to try a piece of wit, is to translate it into a different language. If it bears...
Full view - About this book

The British Essayists: Guardian

James Ferguson - English essays - 1819
...vigour of body and ease of mind. The pun is defined by one, who seems 'to be no well-wisher to it, to be ' A conceit arising from the use of two words...that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense.' Now if this be the essence of the pan, how great must we allow the dignity of it to be, when we consider...
Full view - About this book

The Guardian: no.1-82, Mar. 12-June 15, 1713

Alexander Chalmers - 1822
...vigour of body and ease of mind. ' The pun is denned by one, who seems to be no well-wisher to it, to be "A conceit arising from the use of two words...that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense." Now if this be the essence of the pun, how great must we allow the dignity of it to be, when we consider...
Full view - About this book

The British essayists, with prefaces by A. Chalmers, Volumes 5-6

British essayists - 1823
...punning. Having pursued the history of a pun, from its original to its downfall, I shall here define it to be a conceit arising from the use of two words that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense. The only way, therefore, to try a piece of wit, is to translate it into a different language. If it...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF