Annual Discourse: Delivered Before the Ohio Historical and Philosophical Society, at Columbus, on the 23d of December, 1837

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 6 - ... death, show itself equal to the whole of that commerce which now attracts the envy of the world. Whatever England has been growing to by a progressive increase of improvement, brought in by varieties of people, by succession of civilizing conquests and civilizing settlements in a series of seventeen hundred years, you shall see as much added to her in the course of a single life...
Page 27 - Westward the course of empire takes its way. The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day. Time's noblest offspring is the last.
Page 9 - It approaches as nearly to absolute perfection as anything to be found in the legislation of mankind ; for after the experience of fifty years, it would perhaps be impossible to alter without marring it.
Page 11 - Indeed, whether we look to the acquisition or disposition of the public domain, we find, in either view, enough to call forth our most hearty congratulations. Such, briefly, were some of the leading inducements, to immigration, held out by Ohio, while yet a wilderness. But this is only the foreground of the picture. Behind were clustered dark images of loneliness, and hardship, and peril, which served to test the daring spirit of the pioneers, and give their enterprise a character for dauntless heroism....
Page 11 - There was woman's fearless eye, Lit by her deep love's truth; There was manhood's brow serenely high, And the fiery heart of youth.
Page 23 - But, speaking in this legislative hall, I am reminded that perhaps the best indications of the character of a people are to be found in the aggregate of their legislation. If they have established a superior system of civil polity, they have given the most authentic evidence of superior wisdom, which a body politic can give. And it must be confessed, that there never has been a fairer opportunity than existed here. No hereditary rubbish was to be first cleared away; no time-hallowed customs had acquired...
Page 13 - ... to their birth-place. And then, upon arriving in a new country, the very necessity of their condition compels them to think, act, and even originate for themselves. There are no familiar customs, which require only the passive acquiescence of habit. There are no alliances, of family or neighborhood, in which one leans upon another, and each helps all. On the contrary, immigrants meet as strangers, unknowing and unknown, and must depend upon their own resources. Like soldiers of fortune, who,...
Page 5 - Judiciously then have you combined the two, as the high objects of your association. And surely never, in the annals of time, has philosophy instructed mankind by more useful examples, than the history of Ohio, if worthily written, would record for the admiration of the world. I speak not now of those warlike examples, which form so large a part of the teaching of the past — although Ohio too has had her heroic age. But I speak of those wonderful examples of peaceful progress, which have never...
Page 22 - ... idea is not original with us. New England set the first example of taxation for general education. It was one of the earliest resolutions adopted by the pilgrim fathers. But next to the merit of setting a great example, is the merit of imitating it. This merit is ours. We have the free school system in actual operation; and I trust it will not be the fault of legislation, if, in the next generation, born here, there be one person who cannot read and write. I have heard it suggested that the ability...
Page 13 - The powerful engine of caricature was set in motion. I have a distinct recollection of a picture, which I saw in boyhood, prefixed to a penny, anti-moving-to-Ohio pamphlet, in which a stout, ruddy, well-dressed man, on a sleek fat horse, with a label,

Bibliographic information