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air qualities of the mind: he heard of Samuel's mouth, Quia Dominus tecum est; and, In manu tua liberabit Deus Israel. And yet, at the last, he heard again of Samuel, Stultus factus es : and after, this sore threat, Jam non erit firmum regnum tuum : and that with the plain cause why, Quia abjecisti verbum Domini, Dominus abjecit te. And so, in the end, God's high gifts, not thankfully remembered, but ungodly used, turned all to Saul's greater destruction.

On the other side, David, a good king, was tossed with all miseries, by danger of sorest injuries, by grief of greatest unkindness ; yet all such mishaps, patiently taken at God's hand, and the delivery from them by God, never forgotten by David, turned all to David's greatest felicity. But David was wrapt in a stranger case and kind of misery; for when God had showed him his greatest favour, and had given him the highest benefits that man in earth could receive, yet God suffered him to fall into the deepest pit of wickedness; to commit the cruellest murder, and shamefullest adultery, that ever did man upon earth. Whereinto he did not stumble by ignorance, nor slide by weakness, nor only fall by wilfulness, but went to it advisedly, purposing all * practices, and finding out all fetches that mischief could imagine, to bring mischief to pass. Yet though David had shaken from him God's fear, yet God had not taken from David his grace.

For, when God did knock, David did open : when Nathan said boldly, Tu fecisti malum coram Domino, David answered humbly, Ipse peccavi Domino. And so, tout of this foul matter is gathered the fairest example, and best lesson, both for prince and private man, that is in all Scripture; for the highest and best, always to beware; for the meanest and worst never to despair; and that, with a marvellous note of King David's singular good nature, who was angry with himself for ill-doing, and not with good Nathan for true speaking.

But your Majesty, in reading the whole course of this holy history, shall better judge of all these points, and many other more, if it may please you to read withal, these learned commentaries of P. Martyr, who, beside the expressing of

* Practice, in the language of our author's age, was commonly taken in an ill sense, for wicked acts, or unlawful stratagems.

+ This had been a very proper admonition after the execution of Queen Mary of Scotland.

182

THE WORKS OF ROGER ASCHAM.

this story, and opening all hard doubts thereof, hath god and learnedly, as a man of great experience and deep judg ment, decided many notable common places, belonging esp cially to the good order of civil government, and therefo very fit for the knowledge of all good princes.

And therefore was I very willing to offer this book to you Majesty, wherein, as in a fair glass, your Majesty shall se and acknowledge, by God's dealings with David, even ver many like good dealings of God with your Majesty; an thereby find yourself bound, both daily to say with David Quid retribuam Domino pro omnibus quæ tribuit mihi! an also to promise and perform with David, Benedicam Dom num in omni tempore, et semper laus ejus in ore meo.

An so, doing as David did, hear from God, as David heard Inveni mulierem secundum cor meum; and in the end have a David had, that is, most prosperity, and surest felicity, fo vou, yours, and your posterity. God bless your Majesty wit! all felicity, and send you, with many long years, all heart ease. xxx. Остов.

Your Majesty's
M.D. LXVI.

Most bounden and
Faithful servant,

R. ASCHAM.

THE

SCHOOLMASTER:

OR,

A PLAIN AND PERFECT WAY

OF

TEACHING CHILDREN TO UNDERSTAND, WRITE, AND

SPEAK THE LATIN TONGUE;

But especially purposed for the private bringing up of Youth in

Gentlemen and Noblemen's houses, and commodious also for all such as have forgot the Latin Tongue, and would, by them. selves, without a Schoolmaster, in short time, and with small pains, recover a sufficient ability, to understand, write, and speak Latin.

CORRECTED AND REVISED, WITH EXPLANATORY NOTES,

BY THE

REV. JAMES UPTON, A. M.

SOCRATES IN PLATO :

Ουκ οίδα υπέρ του άν τις νούν έχων μάλλον
σπουδάζοι, η υπέρ υιεός αυτού, όπως ως βέλτιστος
έσται. .

1 1

TO THE HONOURABLE

SIR WILLIAM CECIL, KNT.

PRINCIPAL SECRETARY TO THE QUEEN'S MOST EXCELLENT

MAJESTY.

SUNDRY and reasonable be the causes, why learned men have used to offer and dedicate such works as they put abroad, to some such personage as they think fittest, either in respect of ability of defence, or skill for judgement, or private regard of kindness and duty. Every one of

those considerations, Sir, move me of right to offer this my late husband (Mr. Ascham)'s work unto you. For well remembering how much all good learning oweth unto you for defence thereof, as the University of Cambridge, of which my said late husband was a member, have, in choosing you their worthy chancellor, acknowledged ; and how happily you have spent your time in such studies, and carried the use thereof to the right end, to the good service of the Queen's Majesty, and your country, to all our benefits; thirdly, how much my said husband was many ways bound unto you, and how gladly and comfortably he used in his life to recognise, and report your goodness toward him, leaving with me, then his poor widow, and a great sort of orphans, a good comfort in the hope of your good continuance, which I have truly found to me and mine;

and therefore do duly and daily pray

for
you
and
yours :

I could not find any man,

for whose name this book was more agreeable for hope of protection, more meet for submission to judgement, 'nor more due for respect of worthiness of your part, and thankfulness of my husband's and mine. Good I trust it shall do, as I am put in great hope by many very well learned, that can well judge thereof. Meet therefore I count it, that such good as my husband was able to do and leave to the common-weal, it should be received under your name,

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