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" For what argument of madness can there be greater than to clamour, strike, and throw stones at our best friends ? Yet this is somewhat less than such a multitude will do. For they will clamour, fight against, and destroy, those by whom all their lifetime... "
Introduction to the Literature of Europe in the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and ... - Page 78
by Henry Hallam - 1839
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Literary Remains of the Late William Hazlitt: With a Notice of His ..., Volume 1

William Hazlitt - 1836 - 315 pages
...the rage of the whole multitude is visible enough. For what greater argument of madness can there be than to clamour, strike, and throw stones at our best...multitude, it is the same in every particular man. For as in the midst of the sea, though a man perceive no sound of that part of the water next him,...
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Literary Remains of the Late William Hazlitt, Volume 1

William Hazlitt - 1836
...the rage of the whole multitude is visible enough. For what greater argument of madness can there be than to clamour, strike, and throw stones at our best...multitude, it is the same in every particular man. For as in the midst of the sea, though a man perceive no sound of that part of the water next him,...
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Literary remains of the late William Hazlitt. With a notice of his life, by ...

William Hazlitt - 1836
...the rage of the whole multitude is visible enough. For what greater argument of madness can there be than to clamour, strike, and throw stones at our best...multitude, it is the same in every particular man. For as in the midst of the sea, though a man perceive no sound of that part of the water next him,...
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Literary remains of the late William Hazlitt. With a notice of his life, by ...

William Hazlitt - 1836 - 315 pages
...whole multitude is visible enough. For what greater argument of madness can there be than to clamor, strike, and throw stones at our best friends ? Yet...less than such a multitude will do. For they will clamor, fight against, and destroy those, by whom, all their lifetime before, they have been protected...
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The English Works of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, Volume 3

Thomas Hobbes - Philosophy - 1839
...of them conspire together, the rage of the whole multitude is visible enough. For what argument of madness can there be greater, than to clamour, strike,...multitude, it is the same in every particular man. For as in the midst of the sea, though a man perceive no sound of that part of the water next him,...
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The English Works of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, Volume 3

Thomas Hobbes - Philosophy, English - 1839
...of them conspire together, the rage of the whole multitude is visible enough. For what argument of madness can there be greater, than to clamour, strike,...multitude will do. For they will clamour, fight against, aud destroy those, by whom all their lifetune before, they have been protected, and secured from injury....
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Introduction to the Literature of Europe in the 15th, 16th, and ..., Volume 2

Henry Hallam - Literature, Modern - 1854
...evil, are degrees of it. He seems to have had some notion of what Butler is reported to have thrown out as to the madness of a whole people. "What argument...the multitude, it is the same in every particular man."x 144. There is a fault in some men's habit of discoursing which may be reckoned a sort of madness,...
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Hobbes's Leviathan; Harrington's Ocean; Famous Pamphlets [A.D. 1644 to A.D ...

Thomas Hobbes - Political science - 1889 - 916 pages
...of them conspire together, the rage of the whole multitude, is visible enough. For what argument of madness can there be greater, than to clamour, strike,...And if this be madness in the multitude, it is the ..,ame in every particular man. For as in the midst of the sea, though a man perceive no sound of that...
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The Ethics of Hobbes: As Contained in Selections from His Works

Thomas Hobbes - Ethics - 1898 - 377 pages
...of them conspire together, the rage of the whole multitude is visible enough. For what argument of madness can there be greater, than to clamour, strike,...fight against, and destroy those, by whom all their life time before, they have been protected, and secured from injury. And if this be madness in the...
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The Ethics of Hobbes: As Contained in Selections from His Works

Thomas Hobbes - Ethics - 1898 - 377 pages
...of them conspire together, the rage of the whole multitude is visible enough. For what argument of madness can there be greater, than to clamour, strike, and throw stones at bur best friends ? Yet this is somewhat less than such a multitude will do. For they will clamour,...
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