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FOR

SCHOOLS,

WITH

APPROPRIATE SELECTIONS FROM SCRIPTURE,

AND

TUNES SUITED TO THE METRES OF THE

IIYMNS.

BY

CHARLES D. CLEVELAND.

THIRD EDITION,

PHILADELPHIA:
E. C. & J. BIDDLE, No. 6 SOUTH FIFTH ST.
New York, C. M. SAXTON; Bnston, PAILLIPS, SAMPSON & Co.;

Baltimore, CUSHINGS & BAILEY; New Orleans, John BALL;
Cincinnati, H. W. DERBY & Co.

1852.

HARVARD COLLEGE LIDRARY

GIFT OF THE
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

July 1, 1929

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year eighteen hundred and fifty, by C. D. CLEVELAND, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

ASHMEAD, PRINTER.

PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION.

No author, I presume, ever made a book without having some good reason for it: and if I were asked, “Why, when there are already so many excellent compilations of sacred lyrics, do you add another to the number ?” I should answer that, admirable as I acknowledge many of the existing selections to be, I have never seen one designed exclusively for schools, nor adapted throughout to their use. For more than thirteen years singing has been a part of the morning devotional exercises of my school, and though I have used a selection* most excellent and appropriate for social religious meetings, I have found a large number of the hymns in it, either in whole or in part, quite unsuitable to be sung by scholars assembled in school. I have therefore prepared the following work chiefly to meet my own wants. If other teachers, after examination, shall like it so well as to use it in their schools, I shall, of course, be gratified.

In preparing my work, I have been obliged, occasionally, to make slight alterations of a phrase or verse in a hymn, in order that it might be appropriately used in a school: for as the alternative was presented to me either to make such

* The “Union Hymns, selected from the Church Psalmody," Boston: not the “Union Hymns" of the American Sunday-school Union.

alterations, or to reject entirely a hymn otherwise admirable, I hesitated not which to do. In all such cases, however, the changes have been as slight as possible, and always, I trust, in harmony with the general spirit and sentiment of the hymn.

In making selections for my book, I have not been ambitious to have it consist mainly of pieces not to be found in other collections. But while a portion of the hymns may be familiar to the massof Christians, and will be loved and sung by them as long as the English language endures, very many in this selection will, I presume, to most persons be new. I certainly have taken pains to cull, from the not inconsiderable stores in my possession, the choicest pieces I could find; aiming to have my book, in literary merit and poetic excellence, as well as in sentiments of pious and devotional feeling and of practical righteousness, the best selection of sacred lyrics extant. How far I have succeeded, others will, of course, decide.

I can, however, assure the critics, that the number of perfect hymns is small-very small. By perfect I mean such as are complete in themselves, having the three unities, “a beginning, a middle, and an end:” presenting one leading idea ; and uniting in itself, in a high degree, the imaginative, the devotional, and the didactic. Still, there are some that unite these excellences, and I hope that some such will be found in the present volume.

In making a selection of tunes, I have confined myself to a few good, old tunes, easy to be sung, and such as for a long time have been favourites among Christians of all denominations. It is deeply to be regretted that there has been, of late, such a mania for new tunes. Every new

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