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True as the needle, homeward points his heart,
Thro' all the horrors of the stormy main;
This, the last wish that would with life depart,
To meet the smile of her he loves again.

When Morn first faintly draws her silver line,
Or Eve's grey cloud descends to drink the wave;
When sea and sky in midnight-darkness join,
Still, still he sees the parting look she gave.

Her gentle spirit, lightly hovering o'er,
Attends his little bark from pole to pole;
And, when the beating billows round him roar,
Whispers sweet hope to sooth his troubled soul.

Carved is her name in many a spicy grove,
In many a plantain-forest, waving wide ;
Where dusky youths in painted plumage rove,
And giant palms o'er-arch the golden tide.

But lo, at last he comes with crowded sail !
Lo, o'er the cliff what eager figures bend!
And hark, what mingled murmurs swell the gale !
In each he hears the welcome of a friend.

—'Tis she, 'tis she herself! she waves her hand !
Soon is the anchor cast, the canvas furled ;
Soon thro' the whitening surge he springs to land,
And clasps the maid he singled from the world.

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MINE be a cot beside the hill ;
A bee-hive's hum shall sooth my ear;
A willowy brook, that turns a mill,
With many a fall shall linger near.

The swallow, oft, beneath my thatch, Shall twitter from her clay-built nest;

Oft shall the pilgrim lift the latch,
And share my meal, a welcome guest.

Around my ivy'd porch shall spring
Each fragrant flower that drinks the dew;
And Lucy, at her wheel, shall sing
In russet-gown and apron blue. .

The village-church, among the trees, Where first our marriage-vows were given With merry peals shall swell the breeze, And point with taper spire to heaven.

TO TWO SISTERS. *

1795.

WELL may you sit within, and, fond of grief,
Look in each other's face, and melt in tears.
Well may you shun all counsel, all relief.
Oh she was great in mind, tho' young

in years !

Changed is that lovely countenance, which shed Light when she spoke ; and kindled sweet surprise, As o'er her frame each warm emotion spread, Played round her lips, and sparkled in her eyes.

Those lips so pure, that moved but to persuade,
Still to the last enlivened and endeared.
Those eyes at once her secret soul conveyed,
And ever beamed delight when you appeared.
Yet has she fled the life of bliss below,
That youthful Hope in bright perspective drew?
False were the tints ! false as the feverish glow
That o'er her burning cheek Distemper threw!

And now in joy she dwells, in glory moves !
(Glory and joy reserved for you to share.)
Far, far more blest in blessing those she loves,
Than they, alas ! unconscious of her care.

* On the death of a younger sister.

A FAREWELL.

ADIEU! A long, a long adieu !
I must be

gone

while yet I may. Oft shall I weep to think of you;

; But here I will not, cannot stay.

The sweet expression of that face,
For ever changing, yet the same,
Ah
no,

I dare not turn to trace.
It melts my soul, it fires my frame !

Yet give me, give me, ere I go,
One little lock of those so blest,
That lend your cheek a warmer glow,
And on your white neck love to rest.

---Say, when, to kindle soft delight,
That hand has chanced with mine to meet,
How could its thrilling touch excite
A sigh so short, and yet so sweet?

O say—but no, it must not be.
Adieu ! A long, a long adieu !
-Yet still, methinks, you frown on me;
Or never could I fly from you.

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