The British Novelists: With an Essay, and Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Volume 47, Part 3

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F. C. and J. Rivington, 1820 - English literature

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Page 288 - Foul whisperings are abroad: unnatural deeds Do breed unnatural troubles: infected minds To their deaf pillows will discharge their secrets : More needs she the divine than the physician: — God, God forgive us all! — Look after her; Remove from her the means of all annoyance , And still keep eyes upon her: — so, good night: My mind she has mated, and amaz'd my sight: I think , but dare not speak.
Page 307 - Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his surcease success: that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'd jump the life to come. But in these cases We still have judgment here; that we but teach Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return To plague the inventor; this even-handed justice Commends the ingredients of our poison'd chalice To our own lips.
Page 215 - Ah, happy hills, ah, pleasing shade, Ah, fields beloved in vain, Where once my careless childhood stray'd, A stranger yet to pain ? I feel the gales that from ye blow A momentary bliss bestow, As waving fresh their gladsome wing My weary soul they seem to soothe, And, redolent of joy and youth, To breathe a second spring.
Page 330 - But now my task is smoothly done, I can fly, or I can run, Quickly to the green earth's end, Where the bow'd welkin slow doth bend, And from thence can soar as soon To the corners of the moon.
Page 29 - O'erhang his wavy bed: Now air is hushed, save where the weak-eyed bat, With short shrill shriek, flits by on leathern wing, Or where the beetle winds His small but sullen horn, As oft he rises 'midst the twilight path, Against the pilgrim borne in heedless hum...
Page 198 - Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain, Our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain. Awake but one, and lo, what myriads rise ! * Each stamps its image as the other flies.
Page 100 - All school-days' friendship, childhood innocence ? We, Hermia, like two artificial gods, Have with our needles created both one flower, Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion, Both warbling of one song, both in one key ; As if our hands, our sides...
Page 148 - But how shall I attempt such arduous string, I who have spent my nights and nightly days In this soul-deadening place, loose-loitering ? Ah!
Page 230 - And oft the craggy cliff he loved to climb, When all in mist the world below was lost. What dreadful pleasure ! there to stand sublime, Like shipwreck'd mariner on desert coast, And view th...
Page 333 - I useful may it be to have shown, that though the vicious can sometimes pour affliction upon the good, their power is transient and their punishment certain ; and that innocence, though oppressed by injustice, shall, supported by patience, finally triumph over misfortune...

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