The Gentle Reader

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Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1903 - Books and reading - 321 pages

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Page 212 - Sound, sound the clarion, fill the fife ! To all the sensual world proclaim, One crowded hour of glorious life Is worth an age without a name.
Page 48 - Until her bosom must have made The bar she leaned on warm, And the lilies lay as if asleep Along her bended arm.
Page 48 - THE blessed damozel leaned out From the gold bar of Heaven ; Her eyes were deeper than the depth Of waters stilled at even ; She had three lilies in her hand, And the stars in her hair were seven.
Page 204 - And said, My Lord, if now I have found favour in thy sight, pass not away, I pray thee, from thy servant...
Page 312 - Good and evil, we know, in the field of this world, grow up together almost inseparably ; and the knowledge of good is so involved and interwoven with the knowledge of evil...
Page 207 - And four great zones of sculpture, set betwixt With many a mystic symbol, gird the hall: And in the lowest beasts are slaying men, And in the second men are slaying beasts, And on the third are warriors, perfect men, And on the fourth are men with growing wings...
Page 314 - Farewell happy fields Where joy for ever dwells! Hail horrors, hail Infernal world, and thou profoundest Hell Receive thy new possessor; one who brings A mind not to be changed by place or time. The mind is its own place, and in itself Can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven.
Page 154 - Come, my friends, Tis not too late to seek a newer world. Push off, and sitting well in order smite The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths Of all the western stars, until I die. It may be that the gulfs will wash us down: It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles, And see the great Achilles, whom we knew. Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho...
Page 313 - That virtue, therefore, which is but a youngling in the contemplation of evil, and knows not the utmost that vice promises to her followers, and rejects it, is but a blank virtue, not a pure...
Page 62 - Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.

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