Prehistoric Textile Art of Eastern United States

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1896 - Indian textile fabrics - 44 pages
 

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Contents

Fish weir of the Virginia Indians
14
Use of mats in an Indian council
19
Use of mat in sleeping
20
Products of the artContinued
21
Section of cliff showing position of grave shelter
28
Analysis of the weaving of the fringed skirt
28
Border of bag
28
Sandal or moccasin from a Kentucky cave
29
Fine closely woven cloth preserved by contact with copper beads
36
Small portion of rush matting preserved by contact with copper
37
Fabric from the ancient pottery of Alabama
38
Twined fabric from ancient salt vessel Illinois
41
Twined fabric from a piece of clay Arkansas
42
Twined fabric from ancient pottery Tennessee
43
Twined fabric with patterns Ohio valley
44
Bits of fabricmarked pottery with clay casts of same
44
Net from ancient pottery North Carolina
45
Chipped stone articlesContinued Page
50
Chipped flint narrow and thick 150
54
STONE ART BY GERARD FOWKE
57
Grooved ax showing groove projections
63
Grooved ax showing pointed edge
64
Grooved ax showing groove entirely around
65
Grooved ax showing grooved back
66
Grooved ax showing rounded back
67
Grooved ax showing flattened curved back
68
Grooved ax Keokuk type
69
Grooved ax showing curved edge
70
Grooved adze
71
Notched ax showing polished edge
72
Celt showing blade thick near edge
73
Celt showing loug slender form
74
Celt nearly round section
75
Celt showing nearly diamond section
76
Celt
77
Celt showing bellshape and roughening for handle
78
Celt showing wedgeshape
79
Celt showing halfelliptical section
81
Thin polished celt
82
Celt showing thin gougeform edge
83
Celt showing scraperform edge
85
Chipped celt
86
Hematite celt
87
Handled pestle with expanding base
88
Pestle long cylindrical form
89
Pestle
90
Cupped stone or paint cup
93
Muller showing polished surface
94
Hammerstone
95
Grooved hammer
96
Discoidal stone
100
Discoidal stone with perforation
101
Discoidal stone with secondary depression
102
Discoidal stone
103
Discoidal stone convex
104
Discoidal stone
105
Discoidal stone
106
Discoidal stone with Vshape edges
108
Discoidal pottery fragment
109
Spud
110
Spud
111
Plummet grooved near middle
112
Plummet
113
Cone
114
Hemisphere
115
Gorget
118
Gorget reelshape
119
Gorget boat shape
121
Banner stone reelshape
122
Banner stone crescentshape
123
Boatshape stone
124
Pendant
125
Birdshape stone
126
Shaft rubber
127
Tube one end flattened
128
Diagram explaining terms
143
Triangular chipped flint
144
Chipped flint
145
Chipped flint
146
Chipped flint with shoulders
147
Chipped fint small
148
Chipped flint short convex edges
149
Chipped ilint edges concave
150
Stemmed chipped flint
153
Stemmed chipped flint ovoid
154
Stemmed chipped flint symmetric outline
155
Stemmed chipped flint
156
Stemmed chipped flint roughly made
157
Stemmed chipped flint with long barbs
158
Stemmed chipped flint
159
Stemmed chipped flint slender with small stem
161
Stemmed chipped flint
162
Stemmed chipped flint projecting shoulders
163
Stemmed chipped flint very rough
164
Perforator not stemmed
165
Perforator not stemmed double pointed
166
Perforator stemmed
167
Perforator stemmed with cutting point
168
Stemmed scraper
169
Stemless scraper celt form
170
Cores
171
Flake chipped for scraper
173
Flake chipped for kuife or arrowhead
174
Stemmed chipped flint winged
175
Stemmed chipped flint
176
Chipped flint with sharpedged stem
177
ABORIGINAL REMAINS IN VERDE VALLEY ARIZONA BY COSMOS MINDELEFF
61
Map showing distribution of ruins and location of area treated with reference to ancient pueblo region 185
61
Introduction 185
61
Sketch map site of small ruin 10 miles north of Fossil creek 200
61
Distribution and classification of ruins 192
61
Plans and descriptions 195
61
Ground plan of ruin at month of the East Verde 201
61
Sketch map site of ruin above Fossil creek 205
61
Sketch map of ruin 94 miles above Fossil creek 206
61
Ground play of ruin 8 miles north of Fossil creek 213
61
Diagram showing strata of canyon wall 218
61
Walled storage cist 221
61
Plan of cavate lodges group D 226
180
292 Sections of cavate lodges gronp D 227
183
Section of water pocket 228
184
Plan of cavate lodges group A 229
187
Sections of cavate lodges group A 230
188
Plan of cavate lodges group B 231
191
Plan of cavate lodges group E 232
192
Ancient work on Clear creek
215
Structural characteristics 248
228
Walled front cavate lodges 250
232
Bowlders in footway cavate lodges 252
236
Fra ed doorway cavate lodges
242
Notched doorway in Tusayan
245
Conclusions
249
Page
267
Introductory note
269
Yellow Smokes earth lodge
270
Ground plan of Osage lodge
271
Omaha tent
272
Exterior parts of an Oinaha tent
273
dejequdes tent
274
Furniture and implements
275
Omaha cradleplan
276
Furniture and implementsContinued Page
278
CASA GRANDE RUIN BY COSMOS MINDELEFF
289
Page
293
Introduction
295
Conclusions
316
MythsContinued Pago
324
Introductory
325
Myths
379

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 336 - ... to the North, the second to the West, the third to the South and the fourth to the East. By the left side of the...
Page 111 - In this month we began to make sugar. As some of the elm bark will strip at this season, the squaws, after finding a tree that would do, cut it down, and with a crooked stick, broad and sharp at the end, took the bark off the tree, and of this bark made vessels in a curious manner, that would hold about two gallons each : they made above one hundred of these kind of vessels.
Page 16 - ... ever saw, considering their materials. They divide large swamp canes into long, thin, narrow splinters, which they dye of several colours, and manage the workmanship so well, that both the inside and outside are covered with a beautiful variety of pleasing figures, and, though for the space of two inches below the upper edge of each basket, it is worked into one, through the other parts they are worked asunder, as if they were two joined a-top by some strong cement. A large nest consists of eight...
Page 346 - Even so!" said the Sky-father; "Yet not alone shalt thou helpful be unto our children, for behold!" and he spread his hand abroad with the palm downward and into all the wrinkles and crevices thereof he set the semblance of shining yellow corn-grains; in the dark of the early world-dawn they gleamed like sparks of fire, and moved as his hand was moved over the bowl, shining up from and also moving in the depths of the water therein. "See!
Page 24 - When the coarse thread is prepared, they put it into a frame about six feet square, and, instead of a shuttle, they thrust through the thread with a long cane, having a large string through the web, which they shift at every second course of the thread.
Page 338 - ... that in turn mature the seeds and perfect the year in autumn. By means of this arrangement no ceremonial is ever performed and no council ever held in which there is the least doubt as to the position which a member of a given clan shall occupy in it, for according to the season in which the ceremonial is held, or according to the reason for which a council is convened, one or another of the clan groups of one or another of the regions will take precedence for the time; the natural sequence being,...
Page 347 - Everywhere were unfinished creatures, crawling like reptiles one over another in filth and black darkness, crowding thickly together and treading each other, one spitting on another or doing other indecency, insomuch that loud became their murmurings and lamentations, until many among them sought to escape, growing wiser and more manlike.
Page 337 - The west is known as the blue world, not only because of the blue or gray twilight at evening, but also because westward from Zuniland lies the blue Pacific. The south is designated as red, it being the region of summer and of fire, which is red; and for an obvious reason the east is designated white (like dawn light); while the upper region is manycolored, like the sunlight on the clouds, and the lower region black, like...
Page 25 - ... they plant two stakes in the ground, about a yard and a half asunder, and having stretched a cord from the one to the other, they fasten their threads of bark double to this cord, and then interweave them in a curious manner into a cloak, of about a yard square, with a wrought border round the edges.
Page 23 - The plant is perennial, which renders the annual planting of it altogether unnecessary. Out of the root and stalk of this plant, when it is fresh, comes a white milky juice, which is somewhat poisonous. Sometimes the fishing tackle of the Indians consists entirely of this hemp...