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A wave came rolling high and fast,

And wash'd my lines away.
And so, methought, 'twill shortly be
With every mark on earth from me;
A wave of dark obliviou's sea

Will sweep across the place
Where I have trod the sandy shore
Of time, and been to me no more,
Of me--my name--the name I bore,

To leave no track-no trace.

And yet, with Him who counts the

sands,
And holds the waters in his hands,
I know the lasting record stands,

Inscribed against my name;
Of all this mortal part has wrought,
Of all this thinking soul has thought,
And from these fleeting moments

caught,
For glory or for shame.

The Fragment Basket. FACTS ABOUT PHOSPHORUS. made, many years elapse before It is now just two hundred years

any application of it is made to the since phosphorus was first obtained welfare and happiness of man. This by Brand, of Hamburgh. So won

remark applies to phosphorus.derful was the discovery then con

Johnston's Chemistry. sidered, that Kraft, an eminent

GOOD CONSCIENCE, philosopher of the day, gave Brand 300 dollars for the secret of its pre- A good conscience within will paration. Kraft then travelled, and

be always better to a Christian visited nearly all the courts of than health to his navel and marEurope, exhibiting.

row to his bones; it will be an everPhosphorus resembles bees-wax; lasting cordial to his heart; it will but it is more transparent, approach- be softer to him than a bed of ing to the colour of amber. Its

down. A good conscience is the name, which is derived from the

best looking-glass of heaven.Greek, signifies “light-bearer," and Cudworth. is indicative of its most distinguishing quality, being self-luminous.

REPENTANCE. Phosphorus, when exposed to the

Repentance is the key that unair, shines like a star, giving out a locks the gate wherein sin keeps beautiful lambent, greenish light. man a prisoner. It is the aqua vita Phosphorus dissolves in warm sweet to fetch again to itself the fainting oil. If this phosphorized oil be soul.-Feltham. rubbed over the face in the dark, the features assume a ghastly ap.

REMORSE. pearance, and the experimentalist He that will not flee from the looks like a veritable living will-o'- occasions and allurements of sin, the-wisp.

though they may seem never so The origin of phosphorus is the pleasant to the eye, or sweet to the most singular fact concerning it. taste, shall find them in the end to Every other substance with which

be more sharp than vinegar, more we are acquainted can be traced to bitter than wormwood, more deadly either earth or air; but phosphorus than poison.-Brooks. seems to be of animal origin. Of all animals, man yields the most;

CHRIST'S YOKE. and of the various parts of the body, “My burden is light,” said the the brain yields, by analysis, more blessed Redeemer. A light burden phosphorous than any other. This

indeed, which carries him that bears fact is of no little moment. Every it. I have looked through all nature thought has, perhaps, a phosphoric for a resemblance of this, and I seem source. It is certain that the most

to find a shadow of it in the wings intellectual beings contain the most of a bird, which are indeed borne by phosphorous. It generally happens the creature, and yet support her that when a singular discovery is flight toward heaven.- Bernard.

Theology for the People,

THE PRIESTLY CHARACTER OF CHRIST. The Priests were an order of men altogether different from the Prophets. The one had mainly to do with time and truth ; the other, with man and sin. These functions, nevertheless, often met in the same individual ; but the union was not necessary. The priests were not merely an order, but an organized body, in which succession was provided for; the prophets were an order, but without organization. There were long periods during which there was no vision. The priesthood formed a chief element in

the ancient economy. Sacrifice was the soul and life of the whole 13. system. Everything existed for it, and it for Christ. From the

days of Adam down to those of Christ, blood continually flowed ; but it could not take away sin. It was never meant to do so: it was only a type, which served to symbolize the Great Sacrifice, which, at the appointed time, would be made for the sins of men. That which justice demanded the Lamb of God suffered, when “ he bore our griess and carried our sorrows,” dying “the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God.” The great and wondrous theme may be best illustrated by the following questions :

Did fallen men need a priest?- Priest, to make reconciliation for They did: “For every high-priest the sins of the people,” Heb. ii. 17. is ordained for men in things per- Did he do this by the sacrifice of taining to God,” Heb. v. 1.

himself ?-Yes: “He appeared to Did Christ execute the office of a put away sin by the sacrifice of himpriest ?-Yes: “We have a great self,” Heb. ix. 26. High-Priest, Jesus, the Son of How ?-"Through the Eternal God," Heb. iv. 14.

Spirit he offered himself,” Heb. Was he appointed to this office ? ix, 14. -He was: “For Christ glorified Was he himself the sacrifice? not himself to be made a high- He was: “He made his soul an priest,” Heb. v.5.

offering for sin,” Isa. liii, 10. Was he confirmed in this office ? The legal sacrifices, then, would -Yes : “For the Lord sware, and not serve ?-No: “It was not poswill not repent, Thou art a priest sible that the blood of bulls and for ever,” Heb. vii. 21.

goats should take away sin,” Heb. a priest, make x. 4. atonement for sin ?-He did: “He Did God declare them insuffiis a merciful and faithful High

cient ?-He did : “ Sacrifice and

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VOL. XIII.

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offering thou wouldest not,” Heb. x. 5.

Was this sacrifice necessary, then ?-Yes : “ What the law could not do, in that it was weak,” that Christ did, Rom. viii. 3.

Did Christ, as a sacrifice, bear our sins ?-He did : “ His own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree," 1 Pet. ii. 24.

Did he bear them by the Father's appointment ?-Yes : " The Lord laid on him the iniquities of us all,” Isa. liii. 6.

Did he suffer for them ?-Yes: “ He was wounded for our transgressions, and bruised for our iniquities,” Isa. liii. 5.

And not for any sin of his own ? -No: Messiah “shall be cut off, but not for himself,” Dan. ix. 26.

Did he suffer to satisfy for sin ? Yes: “He was once offered, to bear the sins of many,” Heb. ix. 28.

And was the satisfaction accepted ?-Yes: “He gave himself for us, a sacrifice to God, of a sweet smelling savour,” Eph. v. 2.

Did Christ offer himself voluntarily ?-Yes: “No man taketh my life from me, but I lay it down of myself,” John x. 18.

Was it his own act and deed to make his soul an offering ?-Entirely so: for he said, “Father, into thine hands I commend my spirit,” Luke xxiii. 46.

Did this sacrifice need to be repeated ?-No:“For by one offering he perfected for ever them that are sanctified,” Heb. x. 14.

Was it designed to save us from ruin ?-Yes : “He gave his life a ransom for many,” Matt. xx. 28.

And to reconcile us to God?

Yes: for “he made peace through the blood of his cross,” Col. i. 20.

Is this our plea for peace and pardon ?-Yes: “Who is he that condemneth ? It is Christ that died,” Rom. viii. 34.

Is Christ, then, the great propitiation ?-Yes: “He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only, but for the sins of the whole world," 1 John ii. 2.

And have we hereby access to God ?-We have: he suffered, “the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God," 1 Pet. iii. 18.

And had the Old Testament saints the benefit of this sacrifice ? -To all intents: for he was "the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world," Rev. xiii. 8.

Does Christ, as a priest, make intercession ?-Certainly: for “he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors,” Isa. liii, 12.

Is he always doing this ?--He is: “He ever lives, making interces. sion,” Heb. vii. 25.

Does he do this as an advocate? - Yes: “If any man sin, we have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous,” 1 John ii. 1. And as

a high-priest ? — Yes: “Aaron shall bear their names before the Lord,” Ex. xxviii. 12 ; and Aaron was a grand type of him.

Does he make intercession in virtue of his satisfaction ?-Yes : for “by his own blood he entered into the holy place,” Heb. ix. 12.

Is Christ a priest after the order of Aaron ?-No: but “after the order of Melchizedek," Psa. cx. 4.

Is he a royal priest?-He is : for "he is a priest upon his throne, and

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the counsel of peace shall be between Have all believers an interest in "them both,” Zech. viii. 13.

Christ's priesthood ?-Yes: for “we Is he a priest that needs a suc- have a High-Priest over the house

cessor?-No: for “this man, be- of God,” Heb. x. 21. C cause he continueth ever, hath an Is this an encouragement in our

unchangeable priesthood,” Heb. approaches to God ?-Yes: “ Let vii. 24.

us, therefore, come boldly to the Is he a priest that needs a sacri- throne of grace,” Heb. iv. 16. fice for himself ?-No: for “the law And is this that which we must makes men high-priests which have depend upon for our acceptance infirmity; but the word of the oath with God ?-It is : for “spiritual makes the Son, who is consecrated sacrifices are acceptable to God only for evermore,” Heb. vii. 27, 28. through Jesus Christ,” 1 Pet. ii. 5.

Redemption by blood is the doctrine of the Scriptures, and the Gospel of salvation. However that doctrine may offend the pride of

man, none other can bring true peace to his conscience, and

deliver him from the wrath to come. This alone is “the power foer of God unto salvation” to every believer. It may be a stumbling.

block to one, and foolishness to another, but to him it is both ps“ the power of God, and the wisdom of God." His blood can alone remove guilt, and faith in it can alone bring righteousness.

To remove the offence of the cross is to cut down the hope of man,

and to extinguish the light of the world. Let every reader, theretfore, exclaim with the apostle, “God forbid that I should glory, ir save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is

crucified unto me, and I unto the world.”

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DEX

BENEFITS OF AFFLICTION.

A Letter to a friend. ht: - DEAR SIR, I truly commiserate God. “I form the light, and create

your variegated calamity, and heart- darkness; I make peace, and create pilily wish I could suggest anything evil; I, the Lord, do all these

which might be the means of admi- things,” Isa. xlv. 7. They spring nistering some ease to your af- not from the dust, are not the effiicted mind, and of assisting you fects of a random chance, but the to reap ample benefit from your

dis. appointment of an all-wise, alltressed situation.

foreseeing God, who intends them You well know that all afflictions, all for the good of his creatures. of what kind soever, proceed from This, I think, is the fundamental

offering thou wouldest not,” Heb.

X. 5.

Was this sacrifice necessary, then ?-Yes: “ What the law could not do, in that it was weak,” that Christ did, Rom. viii. 3.

Did Christ, as a sacrifice, bear our sins ?-He did : “ His own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree,” 1 Pet. ii. 24.

Did he bear them by the Father's appointment?-Yes: “The Lord laid on him the iniquities of us all,” Isa. liii, 6.

Did he suffer for them?-Yes: “He was wounded for our transgressions, and bruised for our iniquities,” Isa. liii. 5.

And not for any sin of his own? -No: Messiah “shall be cut off, but not for himself,” Dan. ix. 26.

Did he suffer to satisfy for sin ?Yes: “He was once offered, to bear the sins of many,” Heb. ix. 28.

And was the satisfaction accepted ?-Yes: “He gave himself for us, a sacrifice to God, of a sweet smelling savour,” Eph. v. 2.

Did Christ offer himself voluntarily ?-Yes: “No man taketh my life from me, but I lay it down of myself,” John x. 18.

Was it his own act and deed to make his soul an offering ?-Entirely so: for he said, “Father, into thine hands I commend my spirit,” Luke xxiii. 46.

Did this sacrifice need to be repeated ?-No: "For by one offering he perfected for ever them that are sanctified,” Heb. x. 14.

Was it designed to save us from ruin ?_Yes: “He gave his life a ransom for many,” Matt. xx. 28.

And to reconcile us to God?

Yes: for “he made peace through the blood of his cross,” Col. i. 20.

Is this our plea for peace and pardon ?-Yes : “Who is he that condemneth ? is Christ that died," Rom. viii. 34.

Is Christ, then, the great propitiation ?-Yes: “He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only, but for the sins of the whole world,” 1 John ii. 2.

And have we hereby access to God ?-We have: he suffered, “the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God," 1 Pet. iii. 18.

And had the Old Testament saints the benefit of this sacrifice ? -To all intents: for he was "the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world,” Rev. xiii. 8.

Does Christ, as a priest, make intercession ?-Certainly: for "he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors," Isa. liii. 12.

Is he always doing this ?–He is: “He ever lives, making interces. sion,” Heb. vii. 25.

Does he do this as an advocate? --- Yes: “If any man sin, we have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous," 1 John ii. 1. And as

a high-priest ? — Yes: “ Aaron shall bear their names before the Lord,” Ex. xxviii. 12 ; and Aaron was a grand type of him.

Does he make intercession in rirtue of his satisfaction ?-Yes : for “by his own blood he entered into the holy place,” Heb. ix. 12.

Is Christ a priest after the order of Aaron ?-No: but “after the order of Melchizedek," Psa, cx. 4.

Is he a royal priest?-He is: for “he is a priest upon his throne, and

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