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Christian Biograpby.

MISS ANN PEACH. “Weep not; she is not dead, but sleepeth."-LUKE viii. 52. Miss ANN PEACH, the daughter of for her spiritual welfare. This inMr. John and Mary Peach, was disposition to obey parents and born at Hanging-bridge, Clifton, friends is one of the common sins of near Ashbourne, Derbyshire, Jan- youth, and one which requires to be uary 25th, 1843. Her mother died exposed and condemned. This selfin the year 1848, and was buried in will is displeasing to God, occasions the burial-ground adjoining Sion much pain to friends, and often Chapel, Ashbourne; from which leads to misery and ruin. The time she was brought up under the young are required by God to obey affectionate care of her uncle and their parents and those his provi. aunt, Mr. and Mrs. James Peach. dence has set over them; and if Though living under Christian in- they refuse, they not only give pain fluence from her childhood, she to their friends, but they sin against manifested no concern about the their own souls. The Divine comsalvation of her soul until within mand is, “ Children, obey your paabout two years of her death, when rents in the Lord, for this is right. there was a marked change in her Honour thy father and mother; spirit and conduct. There were which is the first commandment some points in her natural charac- with promise.” Reverence is due ter it is well to mention, that seeing to parents, and children ought their unloveliness, other young per cheerfully to render it. The want sons may be led to avoid them. of it is a sin in the sight of God. There

was in our young friend a There was also in our young want of condescension towards friend an inordinate love of light those less instructed than herself, reading, one of the sins and signs and an indisposition to manifest of the present age, and which proper respect unless she believed unfits many of our youth for habits others were superior to herself in of sober thought and for the comknowledge and mental ability. She mon and necessary duties of everyhad not learnt to obey the beautiful day life. There is reason to fear precept enforced by Peter : “ All of that at one time she felt more pleayou be subject one to another, and sure in reading a book of fiction, be clothed with humility.” She was which imparted no solid instruction naturally proud, and required the and made her no wiser, than she grace of God to subdue her spirit, did in reading the precious book of and make it meek and humble, like God, which makes wise unto salvathe lovely spirit of Jesus. She tion. She deeply regretted this needed to be taught by the Saviour during her illness, and felt the time her duty to learn of him, who was thus spent was not for her advanmeek and lowly.

tage, nor to the glory of God. The And there was also manifested a number of books of this description want of promptness in obedience to is so great in our day that our youth those placed over her in the provi- had need watch and pray that they dence of God. She was inclined to enter not into temptation. They stay and reason the matter where are travellers to another world, and it was her duty promptly to obey. will do well to consult the book of This often occasioned her aunt much God, a

sure guide to holiness, trouble and anxiety, whereas obe- safety, and happiness. The Bible dience to lawful authority would is the book by which we shall be have promoted her own peace and judged in the last day; therefore the comfort of her friends anxious we should follow its guidance, that

we may give in our account with joy. This is a light to our path.

For about two years before the death of Ann, there were unfavourable symptoms of consumption. Her friends feared the flower would fade, and now their fears are realized, and the beautiful flower is gone, but we trust to bloom in the better land, where the flowers are immortal, and where they live in perpetual sunshine. Means were of course used to restore the fading flower to health and vigour, and at times hope was encouraged; but time proved that all means were unavailing. There was a worm at the root, and it worked its way deeper and deeper, until the fair flower faded away, and now the place which once knew it knows it no more. The flower is gone.

While our young friend was gradually sinking under the power of an incurable disease, her mind seems quietly, gradually, but we trust effectually, to have opened to the reception of the Saviour. She never said much respecting her state of mind, not even when questions on the subject were put to her, but there was an evident change in her whole behaviour. There was manifest seriousness of mind, more quiet thoughtfulness, a greater disposition to attend to words of counsel, kindness, and salvation. Though she would always speak as hopefully as possible of her illness, and even with cheerfulness, there is no doubt she felt that her recovery was very doubtful, and that the night of her life was far spent, and that it was all-important for her to turn her attention to the only Friend who could heal her soul, save her from the wrath of God, and fit her for the glory of an eternal day.

There is reason to hope she was gradually brought to see that religion is the one thing needful, and was led by a Divine hand to choose the good part which shall never be taken away. The truths of the Gospel she had been taught from her infancy were silently impressed on her heart by the loving Spirit of God, and made her feel her

sinfulness

and need of Jesus. Thus she was led to commune with her own heart and with Jesus, and with the realities of an eternal world. There was more felt than was said. The weakness of her body did not allow her to come much to the house of God, and often, when she wished to come, she was prevented by the weather and her feeble frame. The last time she was in the house of God was on Sabbath evening, June 28th, 1857. The subject of the discourse was, “I will surely do thee good. This precious promise we trust was fulfilled in her experience, and we hope that the good begun on earth is now perfected in heaven.

During the last few weeks of her life, she rapidly sank under the power of her malady, and a few days before her death she gave directions concerning a few small matters, and in a way which showed that her mind was anticipating the close of her days. On Wednesday morning, July 29th, after a painful struggle with the last enemy, she closed her eyes in death; and we hope and believe that through the mercy of God and the merits of the Saviour, her spirit, redeemed by the blood of the Lamb and sanctified by the Divine Spirit, entered the better land, and joined her sainted mother and aunt, and other friends who died in the Lord. Her mortal remains were committed to the burial-ground adjoining Sion Chapel, Ashbourne.

There are a few points in reference to the change seen in the spirit and conduct of our young friend, which we would briefly notice as tokens of good. There was a readiness and delight in giving instruction to the young, a work for which she was well fitted, for her Father in heaven had endowed her with excellent abilities. She had a remarkable aptness to receive instruction, and what to some young persons would be a serious task was to her a pleasant occupation. Hence she was capable of making rapid advances in useful knowledge, and when the half-year closed always

Christian Biography.

1

MISS ANN PEACH. “Weep not; she is not dead, but sleepeth."- LUKE viii. 52. Miss ANN PEACH, the daughter of for her spiritual welfare. This inMr. John and Mary Peach, was disposition to obey parents and born at Hanging-bridge, Clifton, friends is one of the common sins of near Ashbourne, Derbyshire, Jan- youth, and one which requires to be uary 25th, 1843. Her mother died exposed and condemned. This selfin the year 1848, and was buried in will is displeasing to God, occasions the burial-ground adjoining Sion much pain to friends, and often Chapel, Ashbourne; from which leads to misery and ruin. The time she was brought up under the young are required by God to obey affectionate care of her uncle and their parents and those his provi. aunt, Mr. and Mrs. James Peach. dence has set over them; and if Though living under Christian in- they refuse, they not only give pain fluence from her childhood, she to their friends, but they sin against manifested no concern about the their own souls. The Divine comsalvation of her soul until within mand is, “Children, obey your paabout two years of her death, when rents in the Lord, for this is right. there was a marked change in her Honour thy father and mother ; spirit and conduct. There were which is the first commandment some points in her natural charac- with promise.” Reverence is due ter it is well to mention, that seeing to parents, and children ought their unloveliness, other young per cheerfully to render it. The want sons may be led to avoid them. of it is a sin in the sight of God.

There was in our young friend a There was also in our young want of condescension towards friend an inordinate love of light those less instructed than herself, reading, one of the sins and signs and an indisposition to manifest of the present age, and which proper respect unless she believed unfits many of our youth for habits others were superior to herself in of sober thought and for the comknowledge and mental ability. She mon and necessary duties of everyhad not learnt to obey the beautiful day life. There is reason to fear precept enforced by Peter : “ All of that at one time she felt more pleayou be subject one to another, and sure in reading a book of fiction, be clothed with humility.” She was which imparted no solid instruction naturally proud, and required the and made her no wiser, than she grace of God to subdue her spirit, did in reading the precious book of and make it meek and humble, like God, which makes wise unto salvathe lovely spirit of Jesus. She tion. She deeply regretted this needed to be taught by the Saviour during her illness, and felt the time her duty to learn of him, who was thus spent was not for her advanmeek and lowly.

tage, nor to the glory of God. The And there was also manifested a number of books of this description want of promptness in obedience to is so great in our day that our youth those placed over her in the provi- had need watch and pray that they dence of God. She was inclined to enter not into temptation. They stay and reason the matter where are travellers to another world, and it was her duty promptly to obey. will do well to consult the book of This often occasioned her aunt much God, a

sure guide to holiness, trouble and anxiety, whereas obe- safety, and happiness. The Bible dience to lawful authority would is the book by which we shall be have promoted her own peace and judged in the last day; therefore the comfort of her friends anxious we should follow its guidance, that

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we may give in our account with joy. This is a light to our path.

For about two years before the death of Ann, there were unfavourable symptoms of consumption, Her friends feared the flower would fade, and now their fears are realized, and the beautiful flower is gone, but we trust to bloom in the better land, where the flowers are immortal, and where they live in perpetual sunshine. Means were of course used to restore the fading Aower to health and vigour, and at times hope was encouraged; but time proved that all means were unarailing. There was a worm at the root, and it worked its way deeper and deeper, until the fair flower faded away, and now the place which once knew it knows it no more. The flower is gone. While our

young

friend was gradually sinking under the power of an incurable disease, her mind seems quietly, gradually, but we trust effectually, to have opened to the reception of the Saviour. She never said much respecting her state of mind, not even when questions on the subject were put to her, but there was an evident change in her whole behaviour. There was manifest seriousness of mind, more quiet thoughtfulness, a greater disposition to attend to words of counsel, kindness, and salvation. Though she would always speak as hopefully as possible of her illness, and even with cheerfulness, there is no doubt she felt that her recovery was very doubtful, and that the night of her life was far spent, and that it was all-important for her to turn her attention to the only Friend who could heal her soul, save her from the wrath of God, and fit her for the glory of an eternal day.

There is reason to hope she was gradually brought to see that religion is the one thing needful, and was led by a Divine hand to choose the good part which shall never be taken away. The truths of the Gospel she had been taught from her infancy were silently impressed on her heart by the loving Spirit of God, andmade her feel her sinfulness

and need of Jesus. Thus she was led to commune with her own heart and with Jesus, and with the realities of an eternal world. There was more felt than was said. The weakness of her body did not allow her to come much to the house of God, and often, when she wished to come, she was prevented by the weather and her feeble frame. The last time she was in the house of God was on Sabbath evening, June 28th, 1857. The subject of the discourse was, “I will surely do thee good.” This precious promise we trust was fulfilled in her experience, and we hope that the good begun on earth is now perfected in heaven.

During the last few weeks of her life, she rapidly sank under the power of her malady, and a few days before her death she gave directions concerning a few small matters, and in a way which showed that her mind was anticipating the close of her days. On Wednesday morning, July 29th, after a painful struggle with the last enemy, she closed her eyes in death; and we hope and believe that through the mercy of God and the merits of the Saviour, her spirit, redeemed by the blood of the Lamb and sanctified by the Divine Spirit, entered the better land, and joined her sainted mother and aunt, and other friends who died in the Lord. Her mortal remains were committed to the burial-ground adjoining Sion Chapel, Ashbourne.

There are a few points in reference to the change seen in the spirit and conduct of our young friend, which we would briefly notice as tokens of good. There was a readiness and delight in giving instruction to the young, a work for which she was well fitted, for her Father in heaven had endowed her with excellent abilities. She had a remarkable aptness to receive instruction, and what to some young persons would be a serious task was to her a pleasant occupation. Hence she was capable of making rapid advances in useful knowledge, and when the half-year closed always

man.

He says,

carried away a prize. Had her life been spared, there is every probability she would have become an intelligent and well-informed wo

Her readiness to attend the Sabbath-school and to help in this good work is an example worthy of imitation.

There is also another point worthy of observation; namely, her enlightened appreciation of the worth of family prayer, in which she found increasing pleasure until within a few hours of her departure. There is reason to hope she had a truly humbling and correct view of herself as a sinner, and that she was willing freely to confess her guilt to God, and to seek mercy through faith in the only Saviour. There was a time when she thought herself rich and had need of nothing, but it was pleasing to her friends to see the proud humbled, and to hear her confess her sinfulness and need of mercy.

She had scriptural views of the great atonement for sin. Her language was,

“I look for salvation through the blood of Christ.” She said to her uncle the Monday evening before her death, “Jesus is my only hope.” She was very patient during her long affliction, which was borne in a way equal to the calmuess of many a veteran in the service of God. She was very careful in her affliction not to give unnecessary trouble to her friends. She manifested full satisfaction of mind with the will of God in the prospect of an early death. Not one repining word ever escaped her lips. Her only desire was to be fully certain of her acceptance with God through the merits of the Saviour. She desired clearer evidences that her faith was genuine, and that she was not self-deceived in reference to the safety of her state. She was also very earnest in her request to her companions to continue in the Sabbath-school, and to do all in their power to bring the children to Jesus.

Her early death should impress on the minds of the teachers in the school the importance of patient

perseverance in their arduous yet delightful work.

The period for labour, as in the case of Ann Peach, may be short, and it is well to work while it is called day. There are other flowers in our Sabbath-school as liable to fade as our departed friend, and the Proprietor of our life requires us to use the precious talent until he come. Occupy till I come.”

The death of our young friend should lead us all to cultivate the friendship of the Saviour, and to do it with increasing ardour. Then, if we are spared for years to come, we shall always have a Friend at hand to give counsel, comfort, and all needful help; and if we are soon called away, we shall have a Friend in heaven, who will fill us with joy for ever.

Would you be safe, happy, and useful? Then, if undecided, now decide for Jesus. Now give your heart to him, now take his yoke; and then, when the Master comes and calls for you, you will be found ready to die, ready to leave this scene of conflict, ready to join Ann in the better land. This will give joy to angels, this will comfort the hearts of mourning friends, and this will soften your dying pillow, and give you evidence that when absent from the body you will be present with the Lord.

The words of Jesus should comfort her father and friends: “He said, Weep not; she is not dead, but sleepeth."

The Rev. H. Hollis improved the death of Miss Peach in Sion Chapel, Ashbourne, in a sermon to young persons, from the words of the prophet, “The flower fadeth, but the word of our God shall stand for ever."

Since the death of Ann, her only brother, and only remaining child of her father, has been removed by death, after a short illness. Thus it is that we are often reminded of the brevity of life, and are called upon to redeem our time, and to prepare to meet our God. What folly to defer our attention to the vast interests of the immortal soul !

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