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of his neglected Bible, read its inspired pages with intense anxiety ; his heart became more and more affected, new light dawned upon his mind; he saw the cross, and felt its influence, and from that day he became a disciple of Jesus. Search the Scriptures ; for in them ye think ye have eternal life.”

2. The preaching of Christ crucified.--The living voice of the preacher is intended both to teach and to convert men. The first preachers of the gospel never lost sight of this fact. They lived for this, they sought no other object, and they felt as if they had no other business on earth but to secure the salvation of souls. No sacrifice, no labour, no suffering was too great to endure for the sake of this all-important work; and they were early and abundantly rewarded. Thousands heard the truth, and were converted. The simple and faithful recital of the scenes on Calvary, the faithful warning, and the intensely earnest appeal, touched their hearts, destroyed their enmity, and caused them to cry,

Men and brethren, what shall we do ?” The influence of the cross is now equally powerful, and wherever it is prominently exhibited, and its doctrines taught in their fulness and simplicity,

the result must be truly gratifying. The preaching of a crucified lar Redeemer is one of God's principal means of converting and saving

“We are ambassadors for Christ; as though God did beseech

you by us, we pray you, in Christ's stead, be ye reconciled to God." Let the “ ambassador," then, be alive to the importance of his mission ; let him see to it that his Divine Master is faithfully represented.

3. The prayers, admonitions, and instructions of private Christians. --The honour of instrumentally awakening the careless, and directing him to Jesus, is not confined to any recognized class of men ; it is the work of every true believer. The father in his family—the Sunday-school teacher in his class—the tract distributor in the abode of misery—and the mechanic in his workshop, may become instrumental in saving souls. This is constantly occurring. God employs a variety of means to rescue sinners from perdition. The humble prayer, the faithful warning, and the persuasive appeal of the humblest of his people are often accompanied with the saving influences of the Holy Spirit. “Brethren, if any of you do err from the truth, and one convert him, let him know that he which converteth the sinner from the error of his

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multitude of sins," II. THE AGENCIES BY WHICH THIS Doubtless the Holy Spirit might

T DISCERNT an immediate operation on the s

tren, whatever ; but our business at py might do, but in what way he and love. In the physical wor his designs. In the great pl does the same. The Spirit human spirit by means ada by means which do not de mind readily and cheerf

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what wilt thou have me to this essential 1. The reading of ti

prejudices, his tastes, and his able to enlighten the

sacrifice them all, if necessary and to renovate the sword, that pierceg

we, brethren, are converted men, our 147. John Griffi and the refreshin p and fervent; we can say,

“We love ter of Castle Lord is perfect

d us.” The heart of a "little child" is the account lodged in the m

fervently glows. This feeling will express aan of his ad duced the mos

ways, all natural and simple. The man of as impressive merchant in

un evinces the strongest attachment to every article. the far ocea

ivine, longs for more God-likeness, and aspires word. It i

e communion with the Father of his spirit. Hin sa my earliest in immortal "Whom have I in heaven but thee ? and there is speakable pr waters,” earth that I desire beside thee.” And, amidst all the education, und calm ani deck of licitly relies on the wisdom and goodness of his Almiga simples, and store

disappointments, and sufferings to which he is exposed 3. excl elderly person—it is like trying to bend an aged oak; but itines of the

Teachábleness of disposition.It is almost impossible to teach it b

child is easily instructed. We have often wondered at the there never progress renewed men sometimes make in religion. Their growth is rapid and continuous. How soon did the blasphemer learn to

Under the influence of genuine religion, the true convert is “changed from glory into glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord.”

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in .ork? Have we personally and individually untial change ? Let conscience answer.

J. H. HUGHES.

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CONVERSION ILLUSTRATED. Kev. John Griffin, of Portsea, in his Memoirs of his Son Minister of Castle Street Chapel, Exeter, who died Jan. 19, 42, inserts the account of his son's experience, presented by him the occasion of his admission to the church at Portsea, which

serve very impressively to illustrate the doctrine set forth in ople. The se ne preceding Article.

STATEMENT. keness, and Having, from my earliest infa

cy, retir nt, in reading hymns and er of his hoyed the unspeakable privilege pious books, suited to the capacity a religious education, under the of a child; but, as I grew in years,

the natural corruptions of the heart And, amik olering care of my beloved parents,

mind was early imbued with were manifested. I was sensible I eligious principles, and stored with did not love God supremely, and religious knowledge, and my judg- made frequent resolutions of be

ment informed on the great and coming religious, but it was geneimpossibly leading doctrines of the gospel. rally to be deferred till some future

period. I resolved to be religious,

when I was a few years older; but en wrondena period since I could exeroise my

year after year elapsed, and I was ion. Their casoning powers, in which I had

not some sense of divine things. still the same, except, perhaps, that I recollect, when very young, to I became yet more and more dishave had many strong and serious posed to put off the decided consiimpressions, and frequently to have deration of eternal things. Though found great delight in prayer and from the influence of circumstances,

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way shall save a soul from death, and hide a multitude of sins," Jas. v. 20, 21. III. THE EVIDENCES BY WHICH THIS CHANGE IS DISCERNED.

Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven.” When the heart is changed, the whole life is altered. True conversion is accompanied by the following signs

1. Humility of spirit.-There is no unworthy ambition, no sinful pride in the bosom of a " little child.” This is beautifully illustrated every day, and were it not for wrong parental training, the natural simplicity of the young heart would appear still lovelier.

new heart” is humble and child-like. True, earnest piety enables the man of wealth, and of intelligence, and of influence to attend with sincere pleasure to the humblest office in the service of Christ. His language is, “Lord, what wilt thou have me to do ?” Like other men, he has his prejudices, his tastes, and his preferences ; but he is prepared to sacrifice them all, if necessary, on the altar of Christian usefulness.

2. Fervent love to God.- If we, brethren, are converted men, our love to our Deliverer is deep and fervent; we can say,

“ We love Him because he first loved us.” The heart of a little child” is an altar on which love fervently glows. This feeling will express itself in a variety of ways, all natural and simple. The man of a child-like disposition evinces the strongest attachment to everything holy and divine, longs for more God-likeness, and aspires to a more intimate communion with the Father of his spirit. His language is, 6. Whom have I in heaven but thee ? and there is none upon earth that I desire beside thee.” And, amidst all the changes, disappointments, and sufferings to which he is exposed, he implicitly relies on the wisdom and goodness of his Almighty Father.

3. Teachableness of disposition.—It is alınost impossible to teach an elderly person-it is like trying to bend an aged oak ; but a little child is easily instructed. We have often wondered at the progress renewed men sometimes make in religion. Their growth is rapid and continuous. How soon did the blasphemer learn to pray! Under the influence of genuine religion, the true convert

changed from glory into glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord.”

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4. Ready subjection to God's authority. Like an obedient child, the truly converted listens to God's voice, inclines his ear to his precepts, and readily and cheerfully obeys his injunctions. His life is a mirror, reflecting the power of grace and the beauty of holiness,

It is truly refreshing to read of the number of conversions which seem to take place at present. But we do not relish the practice of applying the dry rules of arithmetic to this heavenly work. The habit of counting our converts is decidedly improper. No one but God reads the heart. But whilst we rejoice in the fact that men are saved, let us ask ourselves, What have we done for the conversion of souls ? Have we used all the means in our power to promote this great work? Have we personally and individually experienced this essential change ? Let conscience answer.

J. H. HUGHES.

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CONVERSION ILLUSTRATED. The late Rev. John Griffin, of Portsea, in his Memoirs of his Son John, Minister of Castle Street Chapel, Exeter, who died Jan. 19, 1822, inserts the account of his son's experience, presented by him on the occasion of his admission to the church at Portsea, which will serve very impressively to illustrate the doctrine set forth in the preceding Article.

STATEMENT.

Having, from my earliest infancy, enjoyed the unspeakable privilege of a religious education, under the fostering care of my beloved parents, my mind was early imbued with religious principles, and stored with religious knowledge, and my judgment informed on the great and leading doctrines of the gospel. Thus, perhaps, there never was a period since I could exeroise my reasoning powers, in which I had | not some sense of divine things.

I recollect, when very young, to have had many strong and serious impressions, and frequently to have found great delight in prayer and

retirement, in reading hymns and pious books, suited to the capacity of a child; but, as I grew in years, the natural corruptions of the heart were manifested. I was sensible I did not love God supremely, and made frequent resolutions of becoming religious, but it was generally to be deferred till some future period. I resolved to be religious, when I was a few years older; but year after year elapsed, and I was still the same, except, perhaps, that I became yet more and more disposed to put off the decided consideration of eternal things. Though from the influence of circumstances,

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