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of rage, and made a furious charge back among the men. They vanished at right angles to her course, or sideways, and, as she ran straight on, she went through the whole party, but came near no one, except a man who wore a piece of cloth on his shoulders. Bright clothing is always dangerous in

She charged three or four times, and, except in the first instance, never went farther than one hundred yards. She often stood after she had crossed a rivulet, and faced the men, though she received fresh spears. It was by this process of spearing and loss of blood that she was killed, for, at last, making a short charge, she staggered round and sank down dead in a kneeling posture.-Dr. Livingstone.

still went on. Mr. Oswell saw the huge fore foot about to descend on his legs, parted them, and drew in his breath as if to resist the pressure of the other foot, which he expected would next descend on his body. He saw the whole length of the under part of the enormous brute pass over him; the horse got away safely. I have heard of but one other authentic instance in which an elephant went over a man without injury, and, for any one who knows the nature of the bush in which this occurred, the very thought of an encounter in it with such a foe is appalling.–Dr. Livingstone.

DR. LIVINGSTONE CHARGED

BY A BUFFALO. As I walked slowly after the men on an extensive plain, covered with a great crop of grass, which was laid by its own weight, I observed that a solitary buffalo, disturbed by others of my own party, was coming to me at a gallop. I glanced around, but the only tree on the plain was a hundred yards off, and there was no escape elsewhere. I therefore cocked my rifle, with the intention of giving him a steady shot in the forehead when he should come within three or four yards of

The thought flashed across my mind, What if your gun misses fire ? I placed it to my shoulder as he came on at full speed, and that is tremendous, though generally he is a lumbering-looking animal in his paces. A small bush and bunch of grass, fifteen yards off, made him swerve a little, and exposed his shoulder. I just heard the ball crack there, as I fell flat on my face. The pain must have made him renounce his purpose, for he bounded close past me on to the water, where he was found dead.

AMAN WHO ESCAPED BEING TRANSFORMED INTO A WAFER. I MAY here add an adventure with an elephant of one who has had more narrow escapes than any man living, but whose modesty has always prevented him from publishing anything about himself. When we were on the banks of the Zouga, in 1850, Mr. Oswell pursued one of these animals into the dense, thick, thorny bushes met with on the margin of that river, and to which the elephant usually flees for safety. He followed through a narrow pathway, by lifting up some of the branches and forcing his way through the rest ; but when he had just got over this difficulty he saw the elephant, whose tail he had but got glimpses of before, now rushing towards him. There was then no time to lift up branches, so he tried to force the horse through them. He could not effect a passage; and, as there was but an instant between the attempt and failure, the hunter tried to dismount, but, in doing Shis

, one foot was caught by a branch, and the spur drawn along the animal's flank; this made him spring away and 'throw the rider on the ground, with his face to the elephant, which, being in full chase,

me.

TOSSED BY A BUFFALO. THE bush being very dense and high, we were going along among the trees, when three buffaloes, which we had unconsciously passed ing at, as they usually give animals credit for a share of intelligence ; they said that they were laughing because we could not take the whole, and that they would have plenty to eat as well as we.-Dr. Livingstone.

above the wind, thought that they were surrounded by men, and dashed through our line. My ox set off at agallop, and, when I could manage to glance back, I saw one of the men up in the air about five feet above a buffalo, which was tearing along with a stream of blood running down his flank. When I got back to the poor fellow, I found that he had lightened on his face, and, though he had been carried on the horns of the buffalo about twenty yards before getting the final toss, the skin was not pierced, nor was a bone broken. When the beasts appeared, he had thrown down his load and stabbed one in the side. It turned suddenly upon him, and, before he could use a tree for defence, carried him off. We shampooed him well, and then went on, and in about a week he was able to engage in the hunt again.-Dr. Livingstone.

WHAT THE HYÆNAS

LAUGHED AT. THE side upon which the elephant fell had a short broken tusk; the upper one, which was_ours, was large and thick. The Banyai remarked on our good luck. The men sent to give notice came back late in the afternoon of the follow. ing day. They brought a basket of corn, a fowl, and a few strings of handsome beads, as a sort of thankoffering for our having killed it on their land, and said they had thanked the Barimo besides for our success, adding, “ There it is; eat it and be glad.” Had we begun to eat it up before we got this permission, we should have lost the whole. They had brought a large party to eat their half, and they divided it with us in a friendly, way. My men were delighted with the feast, though, by lying unopened a whole day, the carcase was pretty far gone. An astonishing number of hyænas collected round, and kept up a loud laughter for two

whole nights. Some of them do make a very good imitation of a laugh. I asked my men what the hyænas were laugh

INSECT LIFE IN SOUTH

AFRICA. WHILE waiting by the elephant, I observed a great number of insects, like grains of fipe sand, moving on my boxes. On examination with a glass, four species were apparent; one of green and gold, preening its wings, which glanced in the sun with metallic lustre, another clear as crystal, a third of the colour of vermillion, and a fourth black. These are probably some of those which consume the seeds of every plant that grows.

Almost every kind has its own peculiar insect, and when the rains are over, very few seeds remain untouched. The rankest poisons, as the kongwhane and euphorbia, are soon devouredthe former has a scarlet insect; and even the fiery bird's-eye pepper, which will keep off many others from their own seeds, is itself devoured by a maggot.

I observed here, what I had often seen before, that certain districts abound in centipedes. Here they have light reddish bodies and blue legs; great myriapedes are seen crawling everywhere. Although they do no harm, they excite in a man a feeling of loathing. Perhaps our appearance produces a similar feeling in the elephant and other large animals. Where they have been much disturbed, they certainly look upon us with great distrust, as the horrid biped that ruins their peace.

In the quietest parts of the forest there is heard a faint but distinct hum, which tells of insect joy. One may see many whisking about in the clear sunshine, in patches among the green glancing leaves ; but there are invisible myriads working with never-tiring mandibles on leaves and stalks, and be

neath the soil. They are all brimfull of enjoyment. Indeed, the universality of organic life may be called a mantle of happy existence encircling the world, and imparts

the idea of its being caused by the consciousness of our benignant Father's smile on all the works of his hands.—Dr. Livingstone.

Tlye Fragment Basket.

EMBLEM OF HEAVEN. Oh, what cheerfulness, strength, and pleasure did the primitive Christians reap from the unity of their hearts, in the way and worship of God! Next to the delight of immediate communion with God himself, there is none like that which arises from the harmonious exercise of the graces of the saints in their mutual duties and communion one with another. How are their spirits delighted and refreshed by it! What a lively emblem is there of heaven! The courts of princes afford no such delights.Flavel.

THE WILL OF GOD. Often think that the real value of whatever we do is proportioned by the conformity with which we do it to the will of God. If in merely eating or drinking, I do it because it is the will of God that I should, I am doing what is more agreeable to him than if I were to do what should even cost me my life, without any such divine intention. I would advise you often, during the day, beseech God that he would inspire you with a real love of your vocation; and that you should say, like St. Paul, when he was conFerted, “Lord, what wilt thou have me to do? Wouldest thou that I should serve thee in the lowest office in thy house? I will reckon myself here, too, blessed. Provided 'I serve thee, I care not in what capacity.” And coming more particularly to what is vexing,

“ Wouldest thou that I should do such and such a thing ? Alas! O Lord, though I am not worthy, willingly will I do it.”St. Francis de Sales.

POWER OF PRAYER. Prayer has divided seas, rolled up flowing rivers, made flinty rocks gush into fountains, quenched flames of fire, muzzled lions, disarmed vipers and poisons, marshalled the stars against the wicked, stopped the course of the moon, arrested the sun in its rapid race, burst open iron gates, recalled souls from eternity, conquered the strongest devils, commanded legions of angels down from heaven. Prayer has bridled and chained the raging passions of man, and routed and destroyed vast armies of proud, daring, blustering atheists. Prayer has brought one man from the bottom of the sea, and carried another in a chariot of fire to heaven! What has not prayer done !-Ryland.

TEMPTATION. Temptation will give oil and fuel to our lusts-incite, provoke, and make them tumultuate and rage beyond measure. Tendering to a lust a suitable object, advantage, occasion, it heightens and exasperates it, makes it for a season wholly predominant. So dealt it with carnal fear, in Peter; with pride, in Hezekiah; with covetousness, in Achan; with uncleanliness, in David; with worldliness, in Demas; with ambition, in Diotrephes. It will lay the reins on the neck of a lust, and put spurs to the sides of it, that it may rush forward like a horse into the battle.-- Owen.

FAITH. He who does not rejoice in the Lord, and feel God's peace as a cordial at his heart, is a Christian of a low form, and hardly a believer. Why are so often lumpish,

you say,

we

ing at, as they usually give animals credit' for a share of intelligence; they said that they were laughing because we could not take the whole, and that they would have plenty to eat as well as we.-Dr. Livingstone.

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above the wind, thought that they were surrounded by men, and dashed through our line. My ox set off at a gallop, and, when I could manage to glance back, I saw one of the men up in the air about five feet above a buffalo, which was tearing along with a stream of blood running down his flank. When I got back to the poor fellow, I found that he had lightened on his face, and, though he had been carried on the horns of the buffalo about twenty yards before getting the final toss, the skin was not pierced, nor was a bone broken. When the beasts appeared, he had thrown down his load and stabbed one in the side. It turned suddenly upon him, and, before he could use à tree for defence, carried him off. We shampooed him well, and then went on, and in about a week he was able to engage in the hunt again.-Dr. Livingstone.

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INSECT LIFE IN SOUTH

AFRICA. WHILE waiting by the elephant, I observed a great number of insects, like grains of fine sand, moving on my boxes. On examination with a glass, four species were apparent; one of green and gold, preening its wings, which glanced in the sun with metallic lustre, another clear as crystal, a third of the colour of vermillion, and a fourth black. **gra These are probably some of those da which consume the seeds of every Nu ac plant that grows.

Almost every 4gb kind has its own peculiar insect, *2 and when the rains are over, very uren! few seeds remain untouched. The to rankest poisons, as the kongwhane and euphorbia, are soon devoured the former has a scarlet insect; and even the fiery bird's-eye pepper, tha which will keep off many others from their own seeds, is itself de si voured by a maggot.

I observed here, what I had often in seen before, that certain districts abound in centipedes. Here they have light reddish bodies and blue 1 ] legs; great myriapedes are seen cost crawling everywhere. Although they do no harm, they excite in man a feeling of loathing: Perhaps our appearance produces similar feeling in the elephant and other large animals. Where they have been much disturbed, they certainly look upon us with great co? distrust, as the horrid biped that ruins their peace.

In the quietest parts of the forest there is heard a faint but distinct hum, which tells of insect joy. One may see many whisking about in the clear sunshine, in patches among the green glancing leaves; but there are invisible myriads working with never-tiring mandibles on leaves and stalks, and be

WHAT THE HYÆNAS

LAUGHED AT. THE side upon which the elephant fell had a short broken tusk; the upper one, which was ours, was large and thick. The Banyai remarked on our good luck. The men sent to give notice came back late in the afternoon of the following day. They brought a basket of corn, a fowl, and a few strings of handsome beads, as a sort of thankoffering for our having killed it on their land, and said they had thanked the Barimo besides for our success, adding, “There it is; eat it and be glad.” Had we begun to eat it up before we got this permission, we should have lost the whole. They had brought a large party to eat their half, and they divided it with us in a friendly, way. My men were delighted with the feast, though, by lying unopened a whole day, the carcase was pretty far gone. An astonishing number of hyænas collected round, and kept up a loud laughter for two whole nights. Some of them do make a very good imitation of a laugh. I asked my men what the hyænas were laugh

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neath the soil. They are all brimfull of enjoyment. Indeed, the universality of organic life may be called a mantle of happy existence encircling the world, and imparts

the idea of its being caused by the consciousness of our benignant Father's smile on all the works of his hands.-Dr. Livingstone.

Tlye Fragment Basket.

EMBLEM OF HEAVEN. Oh, what cheerfulness, strength, and pleasure did the primitive Christians reap from the unity of their hearts, in the way and worship of God! Next to the delight of immediate communion with God himself, there is none like that which arises from the harmonious eaercise of the graces of the saints in their mutual duties and communion one with another. How are their spirits delighted and refreshed by it! What a lively emblem is there of heaven ! The courts of princes afford no such delights.Flavel.

POWER OF PRAYER.
Prayer has divided

seas,

rolled up flowing rivers, made flinty rocks gush into fountains, quenchedflames of fire, muzzled lions, disarmed vipers and poisons, marshalled the stars against the wicked, stopped the course of the moon, arrested the sun in its rapid race, burst open iron gates, recalled souls from eternity, conquered the strongest devils, commanded legions of angels down from heaven. Prayer has bridled and chained the raging passions of man, and routed and destroyed vast armies of proud, daring, blustering atheists. Prayer has brought one man from the bottom of the sea, and carried another in a chariot of fire to heaven! What has not prayer done !-Ryland.

TEMPTATION. Temptation will give oil and fuel to our lusts—incite, provoke, and make them tumultuate and rage beyond measure. Tendering to a lust a suitable object, advantage, occasion, it heightens and exasperates it, makes it for a wholly predominant. So dealt it with carnal fear, in Peter; with pride, in Hezekiah ; with covetousness, in Achan; with uncleanliness, in David; with worldliness, in Demas; with ambition, in Diotrephes. It will lay the reins on the neck of a lust, and put spurs to the sides of it, that it may rush forward like a horse into the battle. Owen.

FAITH. He who does not rejoice in the Lord, and feel God's peace as a cordial at his heart, is a Christian of a low form, and hardly a believer. Why are we so often lumpish,

THE WILL OF GOD. Often think that the real value of whatever we do is proportioned by the conformity with which we do it to the will of God. If in merely eating or drinking, I do it because it is the will of God that I should, I am doing what is more agreeable to him than if I were to do what should even cost me my life, without any such divine intention. I would advise you often, during the day, beseech God that he would inspire you with a real love of your Focation; and that you should say, like St. Paul, when he was conFerted, “Lord, what wilt thou have me to do? Wouldest thou that I should serve thee in the lowest office in thy house? I will Teckon myself here, too, blessed. Provided 'I serve thee,

care not in what capacity.” And coming more particularly to what is vexing,

" Wouldest thou that I slould do such and such a thing? Alas! O Lord, though I am not worthy, willingly will I do it.”— St. Francis de Sales.

season

zou say,

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