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NOTES ON THE ENGRAVED ILLUSTRATIONS

ON

The Divine Panoply.

HELMET AND CREST.-The cut exhibits the extremes

of form observed in the contrivance of this piece of defensive armour.

In the Arab chief it appears as & thickly-quilted handkerchief, bound round the temples with a fillet of coloured cords; and in the Greek warrior, as a massive and highly-ornamented skull-cap, capable of protecting the head against

the heaviest sabre wounds. COAT OF MAIL. The scaled suits of Dacia have been

chosen for the engraving, as best calculated to display an early, as well as complete “coat” of body

It will be observed that the horse, like the rider, is clad in garments of mail. BREASTPLATE. - In the cut, the Egyptian form of

boss-covered tippet is given, as the earliest known

representation of a military Breastplate. GIRDLE.- A Roman general and a Persian prince

furnish the examples given in illustration : in the former, the Girdle assumes the shape of a jewelled strap, buckled in front; in the latter, as a rich shawl, swathed round the loins.

armour,

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SHIELD.—The picture shows a square form of a Roman

shield, which the soldier wields in defence of a helpless woman and child, - a purpose to which, in

protective warfare, it was often devoted. Sword. — The engraving exhibits a fine example of

the straight double-edged sword used by Greeks of distinction ; and in the back-ground is shown the curved form of sword which first appears in the

sculptures of Rome. SPEAR.--The ancient Egyptian and the modern Arabic

spears—both of them most formidable weapons

are those shown in the engraving. Bow AND ARROW.The examples are taken from the

nation, which of all others, made the most deadly

use of the bow-the ancient Roman. GREAVES AND SANDALS.—The engraving shows the commonest forms of these articles of military

The former is worn by a Greek — the latter by a Roman. STANDARD AND BANNER. - In this cut, the artist,

rejecting the allegorical and idolatrous forms of standard, has confined himself to the display of a simple “Ensign for the people." An Egyptian officer is seen “lifting up a Banner against the

enemy.” ARTILLERY. The engraving represents a party of

Roman soldiers on the summit of a bulwark, engaged in casting stones by the aid of a huge Catapulta.

costume.

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HISTORICAL NOTICE

SCRIPTURE ILLUSTRATION

167

176

182

HE TEACHETH MY HANDS TO WAR

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