Spinoza, His Life and Philosophy

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Duckworth, 1899 - 427 pages
 

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Page 289 - Whatsoever therefore is consequent to a time of war, where every man is enemy to every man ; the same is consequent to the time, wherein men live without other security, than what their own strength, and their own invention shall furnish them withal.
Page 199 - Behold, I show you Truth ! Lower than hell, Higher than heaven, outside the utmost stars, Farther than Brahm doth dwell, Before beginning, and without an end, As space eternal and as surety sure, Is fixed a Power divine which moves to good, Only its laws endure.
Page 303 - The RIGHT OF NATURE, which writers commonly call jus naturale, is the liberty each man hath, to use his own power, as he will himself, for the preservation of his own nature; that is to say, of his own life; and consequently, of doing any thing, which in his own judgment, and reason, he shall conceive to be the aptest means thereunto.
Page 303 - The right of nature, which writers commonly call jus naturale, is the liberty each man hath to use his own power, as he will himself, for the preservation of his own nature; that is to say, of his own life; and consequently, of doing anything which, in his own judgment and reason, he shall conceive to be the aptest means thereunto.
Page 260 - ... nostris ! nee pietas ullast velatum saepe videri vertier ad lapidem atque omnis accedere ad aras nee procumbere humi prostratum et pandere palmas...
Page 30 - A Treatise partly theological and partly political, containing some few discourses to prove that the Liberty of Philosophizing (that is, making use of Natural Reason) may be allowed without any prejudice to piety, or to the peace of any Commonwealth, and that the loss of public peace and religion itself must necessarily follow where such a liberty of reasoning is taken away.
Page 229 - Denn alle Kraft dringt vorwärts in die Weite, Zu leben und zu wirken hier und dort; Dagegen engt und hemmt von jeder Seite Der Strom der Welt und reißt uns mit sich fort. In diesem innern Sturm und äußern Streite Vernimmt der Geist ein schwer verstanden Wort: Von der Gewalt, die alle Wesen bindet, Befreit der Mensch sich, der sich überwindet.
Page 1 - ... quae cum magna modis multis miranda videtur gentibus humanis regio visendaque fertur, rebus opima bonis, multa munita virum vi, nil tamen hoc habuisse viro praeclarius in se nee sanctum magis et mirum carumque videtur. 730 carmina quin etiam divini pectoris eius vociferantur et exponunt praeclara reperta, ut vix humana videatur stirpe creatus.
Page 17 - Cursed be he by day and cursed be he by night; cursed be he when he lies down and cursed be he when he rises up. Cursed be he when he goes out and cursed be he when he comes in.
Page 289 - In such condition, there is no place for Industry; because the fruit thereof is uncertain: and consequently no Culture of the Earth, no Navigation, nor use of the commodities that may be imported by Sea; no commodious Building; no Instruments of moving, and removing such things as require much force ; no Knowledge of the face of the Earth; no account of Time; no Arts; no Letters; no Society; and which is worst of all, continuall feare, and danger of violent death; And the life of man, solitary, poore,...

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