The Gentle Reader

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1912 - Books and reading - 321 pages
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Page 50 - Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.
Page 198 - Sound, sound the clarion, fill the fife ! To all the sensual world proclaim, One crowded hour of glorious life Is worth an age without a name.
Page 299 - They, looking back, all the eastern side beheld Of Paradise, so late their happy seat, Waved over by that flaming brand; the gate With dreadful faces thronged and fiery arms. Some natural tears they dropped, but wiped them soon; The world was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide.
Page 45 - Yet each to keep and all, retrievements out of the night, The song, the wondrous chant of the gray-brown bird, And the tallying chant, the echo arous'd in my soul, With the lustrous and drooping star with the countenance full of woe, With the holders holding my hand nearing the call of the bird, Comrades mine and I in the midst, and their memory ever to keep...
Page 38 - THE blessed damozel leaned out From the gold bar of Heaven ; Her eyes were deeper than the depth Of waters stilled at even ; She had three lilies in her hand, And the stars in her hair were seven.
Page 190 - And said, My Lord, if now I have found favour in thy sight, pass not away, I pray thee, from thy servant...
Page 296 - Good and evil, we know, in the field of this world, grow up together almost inseparably ; and the knowledge of good is so involved and interwoven with the knowledge of evil...
Page 193 - And four great zones of sculpture, set betwixt With many a mystic symbol, gird the hall: And in the lowest beasts are slaying men, And in the second men are slaying beasts, And on the third are warriors, perfect men, And on the fourth are men with growing wings...
Page 297 - That virtue, therefore, which is but a youngling in the contemplation of evil, and knows not the utmost that vice promises to her followers, and rejects it, is but a blank virtue, not a pure...
Page 125 - All we have gained then by our unbelief Is a life of doubt diversified by faith, For one of faith diversified by doubt : We called the chess-board white, - we call it black. 'Well...

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