The Whole Works of Roger Ascham: A report and discourse of the affaires and state of Germany and the Emperour Charles his court ... The scholemaster. 1570. Latin poems. Grant's oration on the life and death of Roger Ascham. Seven letters of Giles Ascham, Roger Ascham's sons, to the Lord treasurer Burleigh

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J.R. Smith, 1864

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Page 114 - Duchess, with all the household, gentlemen and gentlewomen, were hunting in the park. I found her in her chamber reading...
Page 114 - I wist, all their sport in the park is but a shadow to that pleasure that I find in Plato. Alas ! good folk, they never felt what true pleasure meant.
Page 76 - From Paul's I went, to Eton sent, To learn straightways the Latin phrase, Where fifty-three stripes given to me At once I had. For fault but small, or none at all, It came to pass thus beat I was; See, Udal, see the mercy of thee To me, poor lad.
Page 86 - For, I assure you, there is no such whetstone to sharpen a good wit and encourage a will to learning as is praise,. But if the child miss, either in forgetting a word, or in changing a good with a worse, or misordering the sentence, I would not have the master either frown or chide with him, if the child have done his diligence and used no truandship therein.
Page 100 - And it is pity, that commonly more care is had, yea and that among very wise men, to find out rather a cun ning man for their horse, than a cunning man for their children. They say nay in word, but they do so in deed : for to the one they will gladly give a stipend of two hundred crowns by the year, and loth to offer to the other two hundred shillings. God that sitteth in heaven laugheth their choice to scorn, and rewardeth their liberality as it should ; for he suffereth them to have tame and...
Page 235 - Cheke, he, and I, for that part of true Imitation, had many pleasant talks together, in comparing the precepts of Aristotle, and Horace de Arte Poetica, with the examples of Euripides, Sophocles, and Seneca.
Page 139 - Point forth six of the best given gentlemen of this court, and all they together show not so much good will, spend not so much time, bestow not so many hours daily, orderly, and constantly, for the increase of learning and knowledge, as doth the Queen's Majesty herself.
Page 96 - Mark all mathematical heads which be only and wholly bent to those sciences, how solitary they be themselves, how unfit to live with others, and how unapt to serve in the world.
Page 84 - FTER the child hath learned perfectly the eight parts of speech, let him then learn the right joining together of substantives with adjectives. the noun with the verb, the relative with the antecedent.
Page 114 - Her parents, the Duke and Duchess, with all the household, gentlemen and gentlewomen, were hunting in the park : I found her...

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