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pany us in a brief survey of the organs of the Queen Bee, by means of which the hive is so rapidly and effectively stocked.

In describing the respiratory system of the Bee, you will recollect it was mentioned that the two large abdominal sacs which are always present in the worker are absent in the queen ; and if you were carefully to dissect the body of the latter, you would find their place occupied by two objects resembling miniature bunches of grapes, that monopolize the greater portion of the abdominal segment; these are the two ovaries (Pl. VIII. figs. 1, 2, 3), or the receptacles wherein the eggs are developed.

They are bilateral, and composed of an assemblage of tubes collected in a bundle, and all closed at one extremity (Pl. VIII. figs.1,2,3,a). At the other end (6)* they open out into what may be popularly called a common trunk (scientifically the "proper oviduct," c,c), being very small at the extreme end, and gradually widening as they approach the aperture. At the narrow ends of these tubes (a) the "germinal vesiclesare formed, that constitute the reproductive element in the eggs; and as these vesicles pass downwards, or more correctly speaking backwards, to the proper oviduct, they are increased in size by the addition of the “ vitelline matter," or, as it is commonly called,

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the yelk.

See especially fig. 3,6. Fig. 1 represents the ovaries in situ; fig. 2, their general shape; fig. 3, the portion connected with the oviduct.

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When fully formed, the ova, which appear to be arrested at a certain point near the entrance to the

proper oviducts" (fig. 3, d), so that the subdivision into tubes is here distinctly visible, enter these two ducts and pass on to the common oviduct(fig. 2, e), a large central tube formed by the union of the two ' proper oviducts,” and thence they are extruded into the cells prepared for their reception by the Worker Bee.

But a curious feature in connexion with this portion of the Bee's anatomy is the means provided for the fertilization of the ova; these, during their passage through the "common oviduct," come into contact with the male elements, which are deposited by the drone, and stored up in the “ spermatheca" (Pl. VIII. fig. 2, 3), a reservoir provided for the purpose, and connected by a short tube with the oviduct*. By this operation the eggs become fructified, and, in consequence of this peculiar arrangement, a single impregnation by the male is sufficient to fertilize the queen-bee during her whole life.

Unless you were previously acquainted with the circumstance, this statement might appear very remarkable; but, strange though it be, it is but of slight interest compared with another fact recently revealed with the aid of the microscope, and that is, that the union of the sexes is not at all an indispen

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By the side of the “spermatheca” (the little globular wessel) will be seen two secreting tubes (1,7), whose office is not known, but which probably secrete a moistening fluid.

sable condition in the laying of fruitful eggs, but that

, the queen-bee is capable of producing and depositing fertile eggs in her virgin state, from which males alone proceed; in fact, it is now tolerably well established that the eggs wherefrom drones are hatched are in no case fertilized by the male element. To this portion

. of the subject we shall have to refer when we come to treat of the life-history and habits of the insect, and shall now conclude our brief survey of these interesting organs by stating that those of the male somewhat resemble the female organs in appearance, but possess

no feature of sufficient interest to render them worthy of special consideration in a popular work *.

Although our review of the internal anatomy of the Bee has been so brief and imperfect (for there are many other interesting features in this portion of its frame well worthy of observation), yet, when considered in conjunction with those remarkable external organs and members described in the preceding chapter, they must have led you to expect something more than ordinary in the actions of the insect thus physically endowed; and perhaps even our physiological investigations will have called to mind many strange

* The sting, which has been described in a former chapter, may be once more referred to here, for it serves the double purpose of a weapon of attack and an ovipositor. One of the tubes that secrete the poison will be seen at p, fig. 2, and below e are situate the gland in which the poison is stored, the channel through which it enters the sting, and that weapon,

with the muscles by which it is drawn into the body.

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tales that you have read, or heard popularly related, in connexion with its habits and life-history. To these, then, we shall next direct your attention, and the consideration of this portion of the subject will serve to show that all the members and organs hitherto described are perfectly adapted to the performance of the functions assigned to them. Then indeed, when we come to consider the varied impulses and instincts which are the hidden springs that set in motion the visible external organs, subjects of new and surpassing interest will present themselves, and it will be a matter of wonder and astonishment how such a variety of actions and motions can be concentrated in the insignificant little Bee. Then will the contemplation of that unity which characterizes the whole insect mechanism, with its secret springs and impulses, call forth our warmest admiration, and cause us to feel

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CHAPTER V.

THE MAN AND THE BEE.THE BEE AND THE POETS.--CON

STITUTION OF A HIVE.-THE QUEEN AND HER DUTIES.THE DRONES, ARE THEY MEN ABOUT TOWN? THEIR FATE.THE WORKERS.-WAX, ITS COMPOSITION AND USES. -HONEY, ITS CONSTITUENTS; ADULTERATION, DETECTION BY THE MICROSCOPE.-KINDS OF HONEY, BEVERAGES MADE FROM

IT.

ANECDOTES CONCERNING POISONED HONEY.

BEE

BREAD, ITS APPEARANCE UNDER THE MICROSCOPE, ETC.PROPOLIS, HOW COLLECTED AND EMPLOYED; KIRBY AND SPENCE'S (HUBER'S) ACCOUNT OF ITS APPLICATION.-HOW THE BEES ENTOMBED A DEAD MOUSE AND A LIVING SNAIL

WITH PROPOLIS.NATURE AND OCCUPATIONS OF THE WORKER

BEE.—WAX-MAKERS AND BEE-NURSES. CONSTRUCTION OF

CELLS. - MIRACULOUS POWERS ATTRIBUTED TO THE BEE IN

THIS RESPECT.-VARIOUS

THEORIES CONCERNING

HEXA

GONAL FORM OF CELLS: COMPARISON OF THESE THEORIES, AND DEDUCTIONS.—THE HONEYCOMB. —-WORKER-, DRONE-, AND QUEEN-CELLS, AND THEIR USES.---THE LITTLE HONEYGATHERER, HOW SHE FERTILIZES PLANTS. -HAS THE CREATOR FORMED ANY ANIMAL IN VAIN ?-LIFE AT THE HIVE

GATES.- ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF EXCURSIONISTS AND TRADERS.-A PEEP INSIDE.-LIVING VENTILATORS.—THE BEE AND THE MAN AGAIN. - INTERNAL ECONOMY OF THE HIVE.—APIARIAN BOARD OF HEALTH, AND BURIAL BOARD.THE ART OF FORTIFICATION AMONGST THE BEES.

How remarkable is the analogy that exists between the natural history of the human race, as known to

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