Page images
PDF
EPUB

cially the remarkable deviation from the established law, as exemplified in the Bee, must suffice to show all thinking men that the Almighty employs a variety of means to arrive at the same end; and we cannot refrain from adding, that if the same reserve were also exercised in pronouncing upon moral, political, and religious questions, as we have recommended with respect to physiological inquiries, there would be much less acrimony and strife amongst mankind than exist at present.

And, finally, coupling our observations upon the structure and uses of these animals with our experience of their mental qualities, we are enabled to arrive at the following conclusions with respect to ourselves and our relation to the inferior intelli. gences, as well as to the highest Source of all intelligence.

We find that, however solicitous we may be concerning our bodily health and comfort, He has been infinitely more so.

These creatures were made to precede us in the development of Animal existence, to a great extent for our benefit; and for ages, in all probability, our Heavenly Father had wrought with perfect wisdom to prepare for us a suitable home on earth.

The lowly Worm accumulated, and still continues to construct, the surface-soil to which, each spring, we consign the seeds that yield us rich autumnal fruits.

The Fly, meanwhile, is the guardian of our health; and whilst we, ungrateful, rob the parent of existence, her countless progeny protects us from the dire disease that menaces our life.

And then, the sensitive, industrious little Bee flies busily from flower to flower, and, fertilizing blossoms in her flight, makes gay our gardens, lawns, and meadows; and gathering honey as she sings, with this, and with her wax, supplies the means to gratify our cultivated tastes of mind and body.

But when we come to review the mental endowments that animate the lower creatures, causing them thus to operate for the common weal, as well as for our own especial benefit, and compare these with our own reasoning nature, we are led to perceive that, although we have been included in the vast scheme of Creation, and are in a natural sense allied to the animal races, whose physical and mental structure finds its culmination in ourselves, yet there has also been implanted in our perishable substance a germ of that divinity which we ourselves are capable of cultivating until it assumes more and more the image of the Almighty. Whilst even the most highly favoured of our humble associates amongst the domesticated tribes are allowed to inherit only so much of man's moral nature as his caprice sees fit to grant, or his convenience necessitates, every human being possesses the privilege of drawing near to the Eternal and Invisible Father of all, who, being perfect, is ever ready to enlighten those who search for truth and wisdom.

It must, however, be remembered that we cannot claim this privilege as a right; but that in His overflowing beneficence, and in perfect accordance with all His vast designs, He has endowed us with these powers of will and intellect, as the means best adapted for the attainment of the ends He had in view in our creation.

That He has, moreover, in thus constituting us, guaranteed our perfect happiness, provided we faithfully exercise our heavenly prerogative, will surely need no proof, and whilst, through the contemplation of that unity of design and development everywhere visible in Creation, we are permitted to form some faint conception of the Creator, it behoves us on every favourable and fitting occasion to express to Him our gratitude, not only for having formed us in His own image, but for having fitted to our uses these and all His other Humble Creatures.

FINIS.

Printed by Taylor and Francis, Red Lion Court, Fleet Street.

claim this privilege as a right; but that in His overflowing beneficence, and in perfect accordance with all His vast designs, He has endowed us with these powers of will and intellect, as the means best adapted for the attainment of the ends He had in view in our creation.

That He has, moreover, in thus constituting us, guaranteed our perfect happiness, provided we faithfully exercise our heavenly prerogative, will surely need no proof, and whilst, through the contemplation of that unity of design and development everywhere visible in Creation, we are permitted to form some faint conception of the Creator, it behoves us every favourable and fitting occasion to express to Him our gratitude, not only for having formed us in His own image, but for having fitted to our uses these and all His other Humble Creatures.

on

Second Edition, with 2459 Figures (many coloured), in 45 Plates and

812 Woodcuts, 840 pp. 8vo, £2 5s. THE MICROGRAPHIC DICTIONARY; a Guide to the Examination and Investigation of the Structure and Nature of Microscopic Objects. By Dr. GRIFFITH and Professor HENFREY.

“ It contains an amount of well-digested and authentic information upon the wide variety of subjects it is devoted to, which is nowhere else to be found in any one work or set of works. We find it an admirable volume for reference. The articles on the subjects we are familiar with are correct and well worked up as far as they go; and the bibliographical citations at the end of each considerable article direct us to the best and latest sources of fuller information. But it is to the general student or amateur of natural

story, and to the medical student, who can rarely be expected to possess a general scientific library rich in works of original investigation, that this volume will be invaluable; and to these we cordially recommend it.”—Professor ASA GRAY, in Silliman's American Journal, March 1856.

JOHN VAN VOORST, 1 Paternoster Row.

« PreviousContinue »