Humble creatures, by J. Samuelson assisted by J.B. Hicks, Part 2

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Page iv - Where some, like magistrates, correct at home ; Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad ; Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds, Which pillage, they with merry march bring home To the tent royal of their emperor...
Page 13 - CHILD of the sun ! pursue thy rapturous flight, Mingling with her thou lov'st in fields of light; And, where the flowers of Paradise unfold, Quaff fragrant nectar from their cups of gold. There shall thy wings, rich as an evening sky, Expand and shut with silent ecstasy! —Yet wert thou once a worm, a thing that crept On the bare earth, then wrought a tomb and slept. And such is man ; soon from his cell of clay To burst a seraph in the blaze of day ! 1 Mrs.
Page iv - Where some like magistrates correct at home; Others like merchants venture trade abroad; Others like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds, Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor; Who, busied in his majesty, surveys The singing masons building roofs of gold, The civil...
Page 33 - He next separated them by a partition through which they could pass their antennae, but not their heads. In this case the bees all remained tranquil, neither intermitting the care of the brood, nor abandoning their other employments; nor did they begin any royal cell. The means they used to assure themselves that their queen was in their vicinity, and to communicate with her, was to pass their antennae through the openings of the grate.
Page 120 - ... we may call the instincts of animals those unknown faculties implanted in their constitution by the Creator, by which, independent of instruction, observation, or experience, and without a knowledge of the end in view, they are impelled to the performance of certain actions tending to the well-being of the individual and the preservation of the species...
Page 13 - Child of the sun! pursue thy rapturous flight. Mingling with her thou lov'st in fields of light. And where the flowers of paradise unfold, Quaff fragrant nectar from their cups of gold : There shall thy wings, rich as an evening sky. Expand and shut with silent ecstasy. Yet, wert thou once a worm, — a thing that crept On the bare earth, then wrought a tomb, and slept. And such is man ! soon from his cell of clay To burst, a seraph, in the blaze of day.
Page 33 - He first divided a hive by a grate, which kept the two portions about, three lines apart, so that they could not come at each other, though scent would pass. In that part in which there was no queen, the bees were soon in great agitation, and as they did not discover her where she was confined, in a short time they began to construct royal cells, which quieted them.
Page 96 - ... (2) The most important point in the theory is that " All eggs which come to maturity in the two ovaries of the queen bee are only of one and the same kind, which when they are laid without coming in contact with the male semen become developed into male bees, but on the contrary when they are fertilized by male semen produce female bees.
Page 33 - The means they used to assure themselves that their queen was in their vicinity and to communicate with her, was to pass their antennae through the openings of the grate. An infinite number of these organs might be seen at once, as it were, inquiring in all directions ; and the queen was observed answering these anxious inquiries of her subjects in the most marked manner ; for she was always fastened by her feet to the grate, crossing her antennae with those of the inquirers. Various other experiments,...
Page 25 - From the fact that in one insect at least, the sheep-tick (Melophagta ovinus), which ranks very low in the scale of development, we find ALL the external facets of the compound eyes non-adherent and circular.* " So much, then, for the corneal lens of the ocellus of the Bee, a compound hexahedral prism with double convex surfaces.

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