Lend Me Your Ears: All You Need to Know about Making Speeches and Presentations

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Oxford University Press, Nov 10, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 384 pages
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The room darkens and grows hushed, all eyes to the front as the screen comes to life. Eagerly the audience starts to thumb the pages of their handouts, following along breathlessly as the slides go by one after the other...We're not sure what the expected outcome was when PowerPoint first emerged as the industry standard model of presentation, but reality has shown few positive results. Research reveals that there is much about this format that audiences positively dislike, and that the old school rules of classical rhetoric are still as effective as they ever were for maximizing impact. Renowned communications researcher, consultant, and speech coach Max Atkinson presents these findings and more in a groundbreaking and refreshing approach that highlights the secrets of successful communication, and shows how anyone can put these into practice and become an effective speaker or presenter.

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Contents

Preface
1
Audiences Are Always Right
7
The Language of Public Speaking
17
Visual Aids and Verbal Crutches
116
Winning with Words
175
Putting Principles into Practice
247
Body Language and Speech
338
Index
372
Copyright

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