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MINIATURE SERIES.

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ISSUED MONTHLY.

Price 25 cents.

Yearly Subscription $2.75.

1895 May.

By

I. SHAKESPEARE'S ENGLAND.

By
William Winter
II. THE FRIENDSHIP OF NATURE. By
Mabel Osgood Wright

June.
III. A TRIP TO ENGLAND. By Gold-
win Smith

Fuly.
IV. FROM A NEW ENGLAND HILLSIDE.
By William Potts

August.
V. The PLEASURES OF LIFE. By
Sir John Lubbock

September. VI. OLD SHRINES AND

Ivy.
William Winter

October.
VII. The Choice of Books. Ву
Frederic Harrison

November
VIII. GRAY DAYS AND Gold.
William Winter

December IX. THE AIMS OF LITERARY STUDY.

1896 By Hiram Corson, LL.D. January. X. The Novel - What It Is. By F. Marion Crawford

February. XI. AMIEL'S JOURNAL, Vol. I. Trans

lated by Mrs. Humphry Ward. March. XII. AMIEL's Journal, Vol. II. Trans

lated by Mrs. Humphry Ward. April.

By

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MACMILLAN & CO., 66 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK.

THE JOURNAL INTIME

OF

HENRI-FRÉDÉRIC AMIEĽ

TRANSLATED

WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES

BY

MRS. HUMPHRY WARD
Author of "The History of David Grieve," etc.

VOL. II.

NEW YORK
MACMIL LAN AND CO.
LONDON : MACMILLAN & Co., LTD.

1896

All rights reserved

THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

93196
ABTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS.

1898

COPYRIGHT, 1893,

BY MACMILLAN AND CO.

First Edition (2 Vols. Globe 8vo) 1885.

Second
Edition (1 Vol. Crown 8vo) 1888. Reprinted 1889;
January and October, 1890; March and Septem-
ber, 1891, 1892; January and April, 1893; Janu-
ary, August, 1894 ; August, 1895; March, 1896.

Norwood Press :
J. S. Cushing & Co. - Berwick & Smith.

Boston, Mass., U.S.A.

AM

JOURNAL.

VOL. II.

(Where no other name is mentioned, Geneva is to be understood as the author's place of residence.]

11th April 1868 (Mornex sur Salève). – I left town in a great storm of wind, which was raising clouds of dust along the suburban roads, and two hours later I found myself safely installed among the moun. tains, just like last year. I think of staying a week here. The sounds of the village are wafted to my open window, barkings of distant dogs, voices of women at the fountain, the songs of birds in the lower orchards. The green carpet of the plain is dappled by passing shadows thrown upon it by the clouds; the landscape has the charm of delicate tint and a sort of languid grace. Already I am full of a sense of wellbeing, I am tasting the joys of that contemplative state in which the soul, issuing from itself, becomes as it were the

I

soul of a country or a landscape, and feels living within it a multitude of lives. Here is no more resistance, negation, blame; everything is affirmative; I feel myself in harmony with nature and with surroundings, of which I seem to myself the expression. The heart opens to the immensity of things. This is what I love! Nam mihi res, non me rebus submittere conor.

12th April 1868 (Easter Day), Mornex, Eight A.M. - The day has opened solemnly and religiously. There is a tinkling of bells from the valley : even the fields seem to be breathing forth a canticle of praise. — Humanity must have a worship, and, all things considered, is not the Christian worship the best amongst those which have existed on a large scale ? The religion of sin, of repentance, and reconciliation — the religion of the new birth and of eternal life — is not a religion to be ashamed of. In spite of all the aberrations of fanaticism, all the superstitions of formalism, all the ugly superstructures of hypocrisy, all the fantastic puerilities of theology, the Gospel has modified the world and consoled mankind. Christian humanity is not much better than Pagan humanity, but it would

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