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tepor O Breeze! whom the warmth of spring and the Thracian animæ winds carry in a serene car, come hither, where the poplar invites thee with hospitable shades.

2

persultet Here for thee may the free Zephyr bound-through*

vagus the leaves and branches : here may [it] fitting-about supinas

vexet chide the restless leaves, and move the grass in gentle sport.

3 revoluta

fuga While gliding through the sunny flowers, the course of the glassy water invites sleep, breathe-through both

comante me and my lyre suspended from the leafy alder.

4 So may the sky and the suns smile with grateful coun

manet tenance; so may the dew for thee distil with liquid foot, and suspend* itself on the silent herb.

*

* The preposition in the first line, the verb in the second.

PART III.

SELECTIONS FOR TRANSLATION INTO

LATIN LYRICS.

EXERCISE I.

Hope.

1
My banks they are furnish'd with bees,
Whose murmur invites one to sleep;
My grottoes are shaded with trees,
And my hills are white over with sheep.

2
I seldom have met with a loss,
Such health do my fountains bestow;
My fountains all bordered with moss,
Where the harebells and violets grow.

3

Not a pine in my grove is there seen
But with tendrils of woodbine is bound;
Not a beech's more beautiful green
But a sweetbriar entwines it around :

4
Not my fields, in the prime of the year,
More charms than my cattle unfold;
Not a brook that is limpid and clear,
But it glitters with fishes of gold.

EXERCISE II.

The dying Kid.

A tear bedews my Delia's eye
To think yon playful kid must die;
From crystal spring and flow'ry mead
Must in his prime of life recede !

Erewhile, in sportive circles round,
She saw him wheel, and frisk, and bound:
From rock to rock

his

way, And on the fearful margin play.

pursue

Pleas'd on his various freaks to dwell,
She saw him climb my rustic cell,
Thence eye my lawns with verdure bright,
And seem all ravish'd at the sight.

She tells with what delight he stood
To trace bis features in the flood,
Then skipp'd aloof with quaint amaze,
And then drew near again to gaze.

She tells me how with eager speed
He flew to hear my vocal reed;
And how with critic face profound,
And steadfast ear, devour'd the sound.

His ev'ry frolic, light as air,
Deserves the gentle Delia's care;
And tears bedew her tender eye,
To think the playful kid must die.

But knows my Delia, timely wise,
How soon this blameless era flies!
While violence and craft succeed,
Unfair design, and ruthless deed !

Soon would the vine his wourds deplore,
And yield her purple gifts no more;
Ah! soon eras'd from ev'ry grove
Were Delia's name and Strephon's love.

No more those bow'rs might Strephon see,
Where first he fondly gaz'd on thee;
No more those beds of flow'rets find,
Which for thy charming brows he twin'd.

Each wayward passion soon would tear
His bosom, now so void of care,
And when they left his ebbing vein,
What but insipid age remain ?

Then mourn not the decrees of Fate,
That gave his life so short a date,
And I will join my tend’rest sighs,
To think that youth so swiftly flies!

6
est
vis ut

iniquiores Gold has no influence, to dispel the rancorous tumults

discurrunt of the wretched mind, and the cares which flit-around

atria preciosa the palaces of-the-rich.

EXERCISE IV.

SAPPHIC.

The same continued.

1

ipse sibi

Any-one procures repose for himself, who can, with a

avarum

and

little, satisfy the craving ardour of his mind, ducere

tenui support his life with a moderate table.

2 dat.

ambitus rerum From him neither an insatiate ambition takes-away his slumbers, nor the base pomp of gold : nor does

turbine rotat care, with its restless eddy, distract his mind.

3 Why then do we with vain prayers pursue fugitive

metamûr glory, and bound great [projects] by the small space'

impetus incitati [of life] ? The course of fleet time flies ;

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