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PART II.

EXERCISE I.

SAPPHIC.

1 IF, in [these] so-great storms of mankind, and amid

assertor cares and calamities, any-one, the vindicator of Faith, gaudet

decoram is-ready to pass an honourable life;

2 expeditus

liber His example I will gladly follow; and, the unbiassed

honesti referam cultivator of truth, I will restore my years to the fixed rest of a better life.

3

Hereafter, more cautiously my barque, driven amid the

solvet syrtes, and the rugged rocks, shall-direct its course ;

temere insequetur and shall incautiously venture-upon no tides of the It-has-been-advantageous to have approached the rage and the maddened waves of the fierce Charybdis ; that it might be a more grateful pleasure at length to visit the harbour.

ocean.

5

melius sentiunt integram The weary are - more - sensible - of full rest : Pæan, relictis

adjective (when) the rain is-gone, is restored in-calmness; and Apollo pours-forth his beauteous light.

EXERCISE II.

ALCAIC.

marmora

1 ergo Trusting, then, to the threatening south-west-wind,

superabis wilt-thou-venture-upon the plains of the tumultuous Nereus, and the battles of the winds, and the tyrants

olie of the palace of Eolus?

2

adj. Does not the grim image of the licentiousness of-theocean deter thee? Nor the terror of the sea to-be-sailed

equitatus through?* Nor that frequent rushing-on by the petulant east-winds?

* Horace, Od. II., 14, 11.

3

But despisest thou the insolent threats of Eolia, and

subis the anger of the

sea,

and enterest - thou - upon the obvios

irretortâ opposing passions of the world with unruffled forehead,

simili and with the same countenance,

4

With which, being-about-to-walk-through the walls of feriantis

jugera the glad Tusculum, or the fields of the peaceful Tibur,

Anienis thou-enteredst the cool streams of the Anio ? .

5

The direful petulance of the water moved by this countenance subsides. Now I see at-a-distance that acclinata ad

decubuisse the waters reclined against the shore are-lulled in gentle repose,

6

And that the breezes of the slumbering Nereus breathe

Scinde peace. Away-with the delays of the tenacious cables ; perge * animare

velivolis haste to inspire the feet with the sail-filling winds.

* Two dissyllabic words at the end of the third line.

EXERCISE III.

SAPPHIC. *

1

Whoever sails-over the restless waves of the Ægean sea, or in a frail ship attempts the uncertain Adriatic

iniqua through the stormy battles of the Wind ;

2

fluat If the heaven teem with the sudden shower, or the

agat wave raise the tempestuous mountains, his ship being damnatâ oppressed, he prays for the retirement of calm peace.

3

Whoever either provokes the Medes with the quiver, or rouses in war the furious bands of the Thracians, and

Gradivo renews the battles of Achilles with the brave Mars ;

4

Marte He at length prays-for repose ; and, free-from war,

sine nube desires tranquil, cloudless days, and to live a soldier and a general for himself beneath a lowly roof.

5

vēnit But peace is-to-be-purchased neither by the price of

blandiori allapsu shining ore, nor by the softer stream of the Pactolus,

bracteati nor the streams of the gold-bearing Hermus.

W

Compare Horace, Od. I

16.

6
est
vis ut

iniquiores Gold has no influence, to dispel the rancorous tumults

discurrunt of the wretched mind, and the cares which flit-around

atria preciosa the palaces of-the-rich.

EXERCISE IV.

SAPPHIC.

The same continued.

1

ipse sibi

avarum

'Any-one procures repose for himself, who can,

with a , little, satisfy the craving ardour of his mind, and ducere

tenui support his life with a moderate table.

2 dat.

ambitus rerum From him neither an insatiate ambition takes-away his slumbers, nor the base pomp of gold : nor does

turbine rotat care, with its restless eddy, distract his mind.

3

Why then do we with vain prayers pursue fugitive

metamûr glory, and bound great [projects] by the small space

impetus incitati (of life] ? The course of fleet time Aies;

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