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2 A gentler breath of the murmuring East-wind shall blow-through thee : let-it-delight me

in-the-mean-time
To-have-reclined my neck, and (on) the green

temere
Bank thus carelessly to-have-lain.

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Alas! what clouds cover the serene
Heaven suddenly! What a sound of showers !

Let us rise : Ah, joys ever with fleeting

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part. in rus
Pace doomed-to-pass !

EXERCISE L XVI.

SAPPHIC.

Hoc est
Vivere bis.--MARTIAL.

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Bruma modo
The winter, which now covers the hoary valleys,
Deteget

abl. abs. jaculante Will-uncover [them], when-the- sun strikes the

neighbouring mountains, Again. To you, when snowy Old-age's winter

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pruinis Has fallen on your] head with [its] sere hoariness,

decidet [It] will never fall-off. Swift Summer flies, Autumn flies : the times will fly, of approaching

Spring.

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But to you cold, and to [your] head grey-hairs
Will always adhere : neither much nard,
Nor repeated garlands, will-take-away

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purùm gratum
The little-pleasing colour.

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4 [Thee), whom youth alone had given to us, Thee will old-age alone snatch (from] us.

geminare But (thou] canst, [O] Publius ! double by great

sæcula Fame (thy] years.

5 This (man), whom (when] snatched away [his) citizens have lamented,

scribat Has lived long. Let every-one appoint to himself Fame

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(As his] heir : the avaricious Moons

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Snatch-away other-things.

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EXERCISE LXVII.

ALCAIC.

Urbani laudes.

1 [O] Urban ! greatest of kings; [0] Urban! greatest of bards; for thee the Pegasean Temo Car, and chariot about-to-fly far

populos Over kingdoms and nations,

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Eripe Is long-ago with me.* Raise thyself from the ground; Raise from the oblivious clouds Both (thy) name and praises. O [thou) once to the council of the Gods

patrio And to [thy] native

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Heaven promised! Thee, above the renowned (places]

pl. Of earth, and the Acroceraunia

Egressa Soaring-beyond the high clouds : thee, pl.

superni Above the neck and shoulders of the lofty Pindus,

acc.

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Will-I-struggle to raise aloft, not without the Deity; Thou shalt go, about-to-leave beneath (thy] feet the

sluggish Cities and t nations,

The new guest of the astonished air,

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5

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Hâc

licebit By this way, whence it-shall-be-permitted to-admire

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Nerei the shores of the vast sea, And rivers, and plains, and hills,

* See Horace, Od. III. 29. 5.
+ Que connected with relicturus.

And citadels from-above, and

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To number the lands swimming in Ocean,

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6 Coram In thy presence. Now to thee the barbarian

supinis annuit Hæmus, with [his] bending hills, bows;

aulâ And afar, [thy) court being saluted,

attremit The Acrocorinthus trembles.

7 Thrice the prone Othrys, thrice the side of the trembling Ossa has subsided, thrice Rhodope [has bowed her]

snows, And the lofty heads of the Emathian Pindus

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[blocks in formation]

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And Cynthus, sacred to Phebus, and

Dumeta
The thickets of the pathless Cirrha. For thee

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Cithæron, crowned with laurel-bearing thyrsi,

nemorosa

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And Pangæa, woody with the wide-spreading pine,

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frondium Rejoice to have extended the arms of (their) boughs

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Far,* and at-a-distance

* Longè tetendisse, et procul obvios.

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To adore (thy] meeting chariots, and [beneath thee]

flying
supposuisse
To place (their) steep backs.

EXERCISE LXVIII.

ALCAIC.

The same continued.

1 Hence thou-shalt-permit the pomps to go, hence for

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præpetes
thee the swift Muses

curulibus
To go [in] a hundred superb chariots,
[O] Urban! and [through] the open

Sky thy own deeds to go.

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imago Hear-ye?* or does a lovely imagination

pomparum Of (splendid] trains mock me? Now methinks

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[I] hear the pious plaudits, and

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turmas frementes The bands sounding through the empty azure [of

Heaven).

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pl.

Thrice borne over | the earth and sea,

* Horace, Od. III. 4. 5.
+ Super, with an ablative after its case.

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