Language Acquisition and Development: Proceedings of GALA 2013

Front Cover
Cornelia Hamann
Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Oct 5, 2015 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 615 pages
This edited collection contains 34 papers originally presented at the Generative Approaches to Language Acquisition (GALA) conference in 2013, held in Oldenburg, Germany. It represents theoretically guided, high quality work, and provides impressive insights into state-of-the-art research in the fields of first and second language acquisition and developmental impairments. The studies brought together here cover a wide variety of different (mainly European) languages, focusing on the areas of phonology, morpho-syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and their interfaces. Since their first publication, the proceedings of GALA have become an invaluable reference for cutting-edge research in First and Second Language Acquisition and its impairments – and this volume continues that tradition.

 

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Contents

Input Learner Populations and the Human LanguageMaking Capacity
1
The Acquisition of PP Relatives in Hebrew and European Portuguese
35
The Acquisition of Syntactic Microvariation in Silent Categories
49
InDefiniteness and NearNativeness
61
Elicited Production of Cleft Sentences in 610 YearOld Italianspeaking Children
83
On Focus Encoding in Adult and Child Hebrew
98
The Acquisition of Mandarin Relative Clauses by Preschool Children
120
Not Fully Lexical Verbs in Atypical Child Language
132
The Interaction of Focus Particles and Information Structurein Acquisition
330
The Interface Hypothesis and L2 Acquisition of Japanese Pronouns by L1 English Speakers
343
The Nature of Single Clitics and Clitic Doubling in Early Child Grammar
360
The Use of Case in the Comprehension of whquestionsin Germanspeaking Children with and without SLI
379
Aspects of the Acquisition of Control and ECMtype Verbsin European Portuguese
403
Gender Marking Strategies in L2 Children and MonolingualChildren with SLI
416
Finiteness and Verb Placement in Early Second LanguageLearners with SLI
429
Right Branching Indirect Object Relatives in Child Romanian
446

Optimal Acquisition
148
Nonwordrepetition in Hearing Impaired Children
171
Comprehension and Production of DoubleEmbedded Structures
190
Japanese Direct Passive
205
LexicalGrammatical Deficits in Multilingual SLI
218
The Development of Object Clitics in French
232
Two Analyses for Simultaneous Construals of Relative Clauses in L1 French
259
Causatives and the Acquisition of the Italian Passive
282
Disentangling Bilingualism from SLI in Heritage Russian
299
Pragmatics vs Grammar
315
Locality and Disjointness in Adult Second LanguageAcquisition
460
Acquiring Pronominal Subjects in European Portuguese
476
Insights into the Syntactic Deficit of Children with HearingImpairment from a Sentence Repetition Task
492
Object Clitic Placement for the Diagnosis of SLI in CypriotGreek
506
On the Acquisition of Ordinal Numbers in German
521
Specific Language Impairment and Bilingualism
533
Resumptive Relatives and Passive Relatives in Italian CochlearImplanted and Normal Hearing Children
568
Comprehension of who Questions in German Childrenwith Hearing Impairment
584
List of Contributors
604
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About the author (2015)

Cornelia Hamann is Professor of Applied Linguistics in the Department of English and American Studies at the Carl von Ossietzky University in Oldenburg, Germany, a position she has held since 2004. She obtained her PhD at the University of Freiburg and her Habilitation at the University of Tübingen, and became a leading expert in the field of language acquisition and impairment during her work at the University of Geneva.

Esther Ruigendijk has been a Professor in the Department of Dutch Studies at the Carl von Ossietzky University in Oldenburg, Germany, since 2005. She received her PhD in 2002 from the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. Her research interests include language acquisition, language impairment, and language processing. Within these areas, she concentrates on syntactic and lexical phenomena.

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